Tag: voting

A Sense of Humor in a Serious Time

The reason I like to use political cartoons in my blog is that a sense of humor is essential in life, even when circumstances might seem to dictate that we should be serious all the time. Those who read my blog regularly know that I am quite serious about my Christian faith and that I am concerned for the culture and the governing of our society. Sometimes, though, these forays into humor help us see the ridiculous side of humanity… Read more »

The Final Balloon Drop

I have been voting in presidential elections since 1972. There have been some terrible nominees along the way, but never before has the perfect storm erupted until this year. Never before have both parties scraped the bottom of this candidate barrel so thoroughly, leaving the American people with no tolerable choice. Yes, I know a lot of voters are choosing one of these nominees anyway, but most are doing so with grave concerns, and for good reason. The Democrat convention… Read more »

Christian Principled Constitutional Conservatism: A Personal Manifesto

Another critical election looms. With each new round of presidential elections, I tend to be astounded by the way people vote—usually without any solid foundational thinking. So I decided to publish how I approach this very serious responsibility. Here, therefore, is my attempt at a personal manifesto. I believe in Christian principled constitutional conservatism. Let me now explain what that means to me. Christian Jesus Christ is Lord of all aspects of life. My own life would have no meaning… Read more »

A Personal Perspective on Evangelical Support for Trump

This is going to be a calmer post than I originally intended. My emotions ran high Saturday night with the results of the South Carolina primary. Make no mistake, I am deeply disturbed by political developments in the Republican party, but I will attempt to offer a reasonable commentary to explain my deep concern. While Trump’s victory, in itself, is disturbing, it’s the way he won that bothers me more—with the apparent backing of a plurality of evangelicals. According to… Read more »

Lewis & the Omnicompetent State (Part 1)

C. S. Lewis often protested that he had no interest in or taste for politics. What he really meant by that was the type of politics he imbibed growing up in a Belfast suburb, listening to his father discuss with friends the nature of the local and national politics of his Irish/English homeland. Was it the pettiness that turned him against political discussion or the boredom he suffered from those overheard conversations? Whatever the cause, he normally abhorred purely political… Read more »

What People Don’t Know

Teaching about Andrew Jackson and his faith in the common people the other day, I noted another of my Snyderian truisms: “Public opinion polls are not the fount of all wisdom.” I mentioned to my class that it really would be nice if voters had some concept of how our government was set up in the Constitution and what limitations there are on the federal government’s authority before allowing them to vote. Of course, it would be rather unwieldy to… Read more »

Today’s Oxymoron: Mandatory Choice

Perhaps lost in the avalanche of bad news in recent days was President Obama’s trial balloon in which he suggested that all Americans should be forced to vote. There are countries in the world who do that, and one that used to do so was the Soviet Union. An astounding 98% or so of its citizens would show up at the polls. Of course, if they didn’t vote, they were put on a list of non-compliant citizens who deserved watching…. Read more »