Month: January 2014

A Year of Action?

Today’s commentary will be brief, and will serve as an addendum to yesterday’s concern over President Obama’s stated goal to act unilaterally to force through his agenda. He proclaimed this will be a “year of action.” Well, the cartoonists have picked up on that phrase rather quickly. I love how the following cartoon captures the true spirit of the declaration: Of course, Congress may not take this lying down. They may want a part of the action also: “Sigh”

Three Branches, Not One

Most political commentators, whether liberal or conservative, have formed a consensus about the latest State of the Union Address: it was too long and it is not going to go down in history as memorable. What we heard is what I anticipated—the same old thing we’ve heard for five years, topped off with a hubris that leaves one shaking one’s head over how anyone can come across as that arrogant. Amidst all the foolish and/or dangerous comments and ideas in… Read more »

The Very Preventable President Hillary

One of the favorite tricks of politicians is to talk in vague terms about responsibility and regrets, while never really taking responsibility or making it clear just what regrets they mean precisely. Hillary Clinton did her best the other day to continue this dishonorable tradition. In an interview on CNN, she said, when asked about her tenure as secretary of state, “My biggest regret is what happened in Benghazi.” But that’s about as far as it went. Let’s review: The… Read more »

The State of Our Union

The State of the Union Address is tonight. I used to enjoy watching some of those, especially when Reagan was president. Now, not so much. Everyone knows in advance what President Obama will say. He’ll be on the attack, blaming Republicans for stopping his agenda. He may even repeat his threat of a few days ago when he said he would go around Congress and operate by executive orders. He’s already been doing that, to the extent that he can… Read more »

Movie Review: Gimme Shelter

Gimme Shelter almost didn’t make it into theaters. It was too high budget, well made, and powerful in its message for many Hollywood types. You may ask, “Why wouldn’t Hollywood want to release a movie of such high quality?” It all had to do with the theme: it has a strong pro-life message. The director, Ron Krauss, who has a solid reputation in Tinseltown, was stunned at the resistance to the film. In his words, It’s a miracle that this… Read more »

Finney: The Ultimate Intention of Our Choices

I’ve often heard people say—and ministers of the Gospel teach—that the motives for our actions can be mixed; that is to say, when we choose to do something, we might do so both for God and for us simultaneously. In other words, our actions are partly holy in intention and partly selfish. Charles Finney disagreed with this formulation. In his Systematic Theology, he explained why: Whenever a moral being prefers or chooses his own gratification, or his own interest, in… Read more »

Lewis: The Self-Centeredness of Hell

Modern man doesn’t like to talk much about hell, unless it’s in some fanciful movie creation where one doesn’t have to worry about its reality. The reason we avoid thinking about the possibility of hell can be traced back to our similar reluctance to consider seriously our sinfulness. And what bothers us the most, I believe, about the idea of sin is that we know the root of it is our self-centeredness. We like being self-focused; we feel justified in… Read more »