Month: July 2011

Matthew 8:5-13

And when Jesus entered Capernaum, a centurion came to Him, imploring Him, and saying, “Lord, my servant is lying paralyzed at home, fearfully tormented.” Jesus said to him, “I will come and heal him.” But the centurion said, “Lord, I am not worthy for You to come under my roof, but just say the word, and my servant will be healed. For I also am a man under authority, with soldiers under me; and I say to this one, ‘Go!’… Read more »

Defining Compromise–The Obama Way

For the third time, the House of Representatives—this time with zero Democrat votes—sent a bill to the Senate to deal with the budget and the debt ceiling. And for the third time, the Senate has turned it down. President Obama gave another speech—this is getting really old—talking about how the Republicans need to learn how to compromise.  He’s had three options from Republicans, the last one pretty close to what was almost agreed to last weekend, except for the provision… Read more »

Media Groupies

We’re still waiting for a vote in the House on the Boehner bill. It was supposed to be last evening, but it has been put off, I understand, to tweak it some more. Hopefully, the tweaking that is going on will give it more muscle so that the rest of the Republicans can feel comfortable voting for it. If you look at this whole episode without undue bias, one thing you have to admit, no matter which side you’re on,… Read more »

The Moral Equivalence Fallacy

I was introduced to the concept of moral equivalence when I was working on my doctorate in history. It came up in explanations of the Cold War. Moral equivalence, in that context, meant that the Cold War was the result, not of Soviet aggression, but of a mutual misunderstanding of one another. Further, it posited that there was no real difference morally between the Soviets and America; both were equally to blame for the Cold War. As an explanation for… Read more »

Captain Greece?

I think President Obama’s Monday evening address was an attempt to make it seem like he’s still the key person in the debt debate, when in fact he has been left in the dust. He has never laid out a specific plan, yet castigates those who do, all the while blaming them for an impending crisis. His character seems to be pretty fixed—blame everyone but himself for problems. I’ve often commented that he lives in a fantasy world; he isn’t… Read more »

Principle & Compromise: Not Always at Odds

I’ve called this blog Pondering Principles because I’m dedicated to laying a principled foundation for whatever subject I scrutinize. I also want to see principles—Biblical principles—become the basis for all public policy. Those of us oriented toward principles have a natural aversion to compromise; we have a tendency to see all compromise as a step backward. I would like to argue that is not the case. Let’s start historically and work our way to present-day issues. At the Constitutional Convention,… Read more »

Facts vs. Sleight of Hand

Perusing Facebook this morning, I came across this comment from my congressman, Dennis Ross of Florida: In the past 10 years (2000-2010), revenue to the federal government has grown 7%. We have not lost revenue because of tax cuts, wars, etc. Federal spending, on the other hand, in the past 10 years, has grown 93%. In 10 years, we’ve spend $28 trillion and taken in $23 trillion. $5 trillion deficit . . . $1 trillion was war, $4 trillion is… Read more »