Month: December 2010

Finney, Government, & Politics

Charles Finney, one of the greatest of the nineteenth-century evangelists, penned a systematic theology that has too long been neglected by the church as a whole. Some people consider parts of his theology to be controversial; I say he is refreshing and bold in his explanation of the Biblical message. Since he was primarily an evangelist, even those who are aware of his theology are in the dark on his views of politics and government. Finney lived in an era… Read more »

Unrenewed Minds

I don’t stun easily anymore. Yet, last Friday, while attending the commencement ceremony at my university, one of my faculty colleagues did stun me with a bit of information. We were talking about the current generation and the influences on their lives. He noted that in his classes, he asks students what they consider their main source for learning about politics and the issues of the day. He reported that the majority answered—Comedy Central. In other words, this generation looks… Read more »

The Dawn Treader . . . & Beyond

I saw Voyage of the Dawn Treader last night. In preparation for it, I watched The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe and Prince Caspian earlier this week. It’s a great way to fill a week. Watching these films took me back to the first time I read The Chronicles of Narnia. They were actually some of the last Lewis works I tackled, probably because I wasn’t attracted to the idea of spending my time with children’s books. Yet, once… Read more »

Progressives & the Constitution

I’m always somewhat amused when those of the liberal/progressive persuasion express outrage that the Constitution is not being followed. What is progressivism if not a denial of the original intent of the Constitution and of the rule of law? The progressive philosophy doesn’t recognize limitations on government power. The Constitution does. Article I, section 8, has a list of powers for the Congress that we call the enumerated powers. They are enumerated for a reason—they spell out specifically what Congress… Read more »

An Endangered Tax Deal?

That tax deal I wrote about yesterday may be in trouble. The biggest potential obstacleƂ resides in the outcry on the Left. They feel betrayed by “their” president. They can’t stomach the idea that no one making more than $250,000 will be penalized by higher taxes. In their Marxian worldview, this appears to be unfair. There is no guarantee that enough Democrats in Congress will support this deal. On the Right, there are concerns as well. Sen. Jim DeMint is… Read more »

The Tax Deal

It appears an agreement has been reached between Democrats and Republicans with respect to the Bush tax cuts—they will be extended for two years for all taxpayers [I was going to write “all Americans,” but then I realized many Americans pay no income tax—52% of us cover the other 48%]. In announcing this agreement, President Obama was more than a little testy. In fact, he came across as downright petulant. One could be forgiven for calling his demeanor pouty. He… Read more »

Idols of Power

I always like to recommend good books. Usually, I focus on newer releases, but once in a while I want to point out a largely forgotten book that deserves more of an audience. One such book is Herbert Schlossberg’s Idols for Destruction. Schlossberg aims at the various idols men create to take the place of God. One of his chapters, “Idols of History,” I use in my Historiography course. Another, “Idols of Power,” fits nicely in a new course I… Read more »