Month: October 2014

The Lewis Project Update

My last two posts provided an update on my sabbatical with respect to research into spiritual advisers to presidents. Another project I’ve been working on is my desire to write a book on the influence of C. S. Lewis on Americans. I’ve posted before about my attempt to collect testimonies from Americans on how reading Lewis has impacted their thinking and their relationship with the Lord. The Marion E. Wade Center at Wheaton College has been the conduit for receiving… Read more »

Lessons of the Reagan Ranch

As I mentioned in yesterday’s post, the second treat of this past week was the opportunity to trek up to the Reagan Ranch. And I do mean “up.” I’m not one for heights, especially when there is a massive dropoff on the edge of a narrow road that twists and turns constantly. But if you survive that harrowing experience, you eventually make it to the top and see this: Doesn’t look like a mansion fit for a president, does it?… Read more »

Reagan’s Presidential Library

I’ve been in California this past week, researching at both the Reagan and Nixon libraries as part of one of the projects I’m working on during my sabbatical. I’ve promised to provide updates along the way for those of you who are interested, so here’s another one. The Reagan Library, in particular, is impressive, not only because it’s located on the top of a high hill from where you can see for miles, but also for its beautiful architecture. As… Read more »

The Angry President? Really?

I’ve never witnessed any president so angry about all the things that have gone awry under his administration. Have you seen the montage going around of all the times he has said he is “madder” than anyone about some scandal or glitch, and promises to get to the bottom of it and hold people accountable? Then, after he makes his “madder than thou” statement, he does absolutely nothing. More than that, he does his best to ignore the problem, ridicule… Read more »

Halfway Christians?

Any endeavor for God can start out with the best of motives and still go wrong eventually. I have a prime example from Puritan history. If you’ve been following my posts on the unfolding of American history, you may remember that when the Puritans migrated and set up Massachusetts, they had a rule that only church members could vote. It seemed reasonable at the time, especially since they wanted to maintain the Christian commitment that inspired their journey. Three decades… Read more »

Lewis: The Education of Man

This past week, I reread C. S. Lewis’s The Abolition of Man. Although I have been reminded of quotes from it throughout my life, probably the last time I had read it all the way through was forty years ago. So, I decided, it was time again. It’s a small book, but packed to the brim with insights on education and worldview. It didn’t start out in book form, but as special talks he gave at a university during WWII;… Read more »

The Road Back to Spiritual Sanity

Islamic terrorism comes to Canada. On Monday, a jihadist used his car as a weapon and killed a Canadian soldier. Yesterday, a more concerted attack occurred at the Canadian Parliament. Another soldier is dead and others are injured. The Islamic convert, fortunately, lost his life before he could kill others. Prime Minister Stephen Harper called it what it was: Islamic terrorism. Our president and his administration are still “getting the facts” and “studying” what happened. Wouldn’t want to rush to… Read more »