Tag: Nixon

The Sabbatical Year

I received a tremendous blessing recently: Southeastern University awarded me a sabbatical for the upcoming academic year. Once the current spring semester ends in May, I will have until the beginning of the fall semester in August 2015 to research and write. In tandem with a colleague in the college of religion, I will have the opportunity to delve into the subject of spiritual advisers to presidents. Our goal is to begin with a couple of articles on the topic,… Read more »

What About Impeachment?

Talk of impeachment is beginning. President Obama’s latest power grab, declaring publicly that he will act without Congress to get done what he considers his priorities, is rankling those who are committed to the delicate separation of powers established by the Constitution. Is this just talk? Are there sufficient grounds for impeachment? Is it even politically feasible? Impeaching a president is a big step. Two presidents have been formally impeached: Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton. A third, Richard Nixon, resigned… Read more »

The Four Pinocchios Award

Political cartoons usually provide the best humor on current events, but sometimes a regular cartoon can do so without intending to. Let’s see if this Garfield cartoon makes you think of someone in particular: Maybe I’m too politically attuned, but I caught a glimmer of our current leader, perhaps striking a pose similar to another disgraced president: Yes, he has similarities to Mr. Nixon, except he’s taken the art of lying to a new level. Even the liberal organization Politifact,… Read more »

Crashing Credibility

President Obama’s promise, “If you like your healthcare plan, you can keep it,” is probably going to go down as one of the more infamous presidential deceptions of all time. James Polk’s “Fifty-four Forty or Fight” was just a campaign ploy to bring certain voters over to his side back in 1844. John Kennedy’s claim of a “missile gap,” intimating that the Soviet Union was now ahead of us in missile development, was a brazen lie to try to discredit… Read more »

Snyderian Truism #8

There is no particular order to my truisms. As I think of one, I write it down and it takes its place numerically. We are now up to #8, which is one I’ve had to learn from experience and also one I’ve seen in history; that’s one reason I share it in class. It goes like this: Bitterness may make you feel good temporarily, but it leads to personal destruction. One of the prime examples I use in American history… Read more »

On Clowns, Presidents, & the First Amendment

I always prefer to write about truly significant events or great insights offered by the wisest people. Then there are days that simply dictate what needs to be written, whether significant or not. This is one of those days. I have a difficult time believing I have to comment on what a rodeo clown did last week, but the story refuses to die. You probably already know what happened, but for the few who live in a monastery somewhere carefully… Read more »

Who’s Paying Attention?

If you don’t watch Fox News or depend on other alternative media sources, you might think the IRS scandal is passé because you haven’t heard much about it lately. That appears to be a deliberate choice of the other networks and newspaper outlets. Yet there is a lot going on. Well, let me rephrase that: there is a lot of avoidance of finding the facts going on. It’s not due to a lack of diligence by the Congress; Republicans in… Read more »