Category: Education

Religion, Morality, and Knowledge

As Americans began to move into new territories after the Revolution, the Congress set up rules for how those territories were to be governed and how they could become states. The Northwest Territory—which consisted of the current states of Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Illinois, and part of Wisconsin—was the first region to be settled. Even before the Constitution was written, the fledgling American Congress under the Articles of Confederation passed what was called the Northwest Ordinance. It was a very significant… Read more »

Harvard & Yale: Solid Foundations

The first college founded in America was Harvard. It got its name from a Puritan settler, John Harvard, who donated his library to get it started. Its motto, as depicted on its seal, is “Veritas,” the Latin word for “Truth.” The first rules and precepts adopted by Harvard stated, Let every Student be plainly instructed, and earnestly pressed to consider well, the main end of his life and studies is, to know God and Jesus Christ which is eternal life, John 3:17 and… Read more »

Early American Education

How did we get to where we are in education policy today, considering how we started? In early America, before we became a separate nation, children received their education from three possible sources, and in this order of importance: home, church, school. Most children never attended a formal school, yet somehow we were a literate society. That’s hard for some people to believe nowadays. Even where schools existed, such as in New England, not all children attended them. They were… Read more »

The Role of Scripture in Education

For those of you who have read this blog over the months, you may have noticed that the guy on the right has shown up more than once. His name is Noah Webster, a man I got to know quite thoroughly as I researched and wrote my doctoral dissertation because he was the subject of that endeavor. I was fascinated with Webster because he became a Christian convert at age 50, and his worldview altered considerably in the realm of… Read more »

Who Educates?

Since the president opened the door for a discussion of education, I’d like to walk through it. As a professor of history, education is my livelihood, and I’ve spent more than three decades thinking about principles that apply to education. As always, I go to the Scripture for my foundations. For instance, in the Old Testament book of Deuteronomy, the nation of Israel was told: These commandments that I give you today are to be upon your hearts. Impress them… Read more »

Teaching Can Be Gratifying

I’ve just finished another week of teaching at a Youth with a Mission base—this time in Puerto Rico. I’ve been teaching at this particular base for seven years now, and each time has been a wonderful experience. Of course, it makes all the difference when you have a roomful of students who actually want to learn something. I regularly teach Biblical Worldview, Church History, and American History at the Puerto Rican base. I’ve also taught the first two at another… Read more »

American Character: Noah Webster

The name “Webster” sounds familiar to most people. They think for a minute and then say, “Oh, yeah, he’s the dictionary guy, right?” Right. But he’s more than that. Noah Webster is a prime example of someone who exhibits the character trait of diligence. A native of Connecticut  and descendant of Pilgrim governor William Bradford, Webster was raised in the Congregational church, graduated from Yale, and even was awarded a master’s degree—unusual for the time. In 1783, he got the nation’s… Read more »