Month: May 2015

Locke, Montesquieu, & the Rights of Englishmen

The American colonists, as they moved toward independence, relied upon the writings of political philosophers of their era to help support their arguments against the British government’s intrusion upon the rights of Englishmen. One of those writers was John Locke, whose Second Treatise of Civil Government provided a bedrock explanation for why they could make their argument. Published in 1690, right after the expulsion of James II and the assertion of parliamentary prominence over the king, Locke laid out the… Read more »

Obama’s Constant Flow of Silly Comments

I wasn’t going to write anything about President Obama today. Really, I wasn’t. But he’s just too hard to ignore when he’s so clueless and/or so ideologically blind that he almost forces me to address his constant flow of silly and destructive comments. I’ve got three examples. First, the whole Obamacare fiasco. His administration continues to claim it’s a success despite all the evidence to the contrary. The company running the website has withdrawn (the second one to do so)…. Read more »

Birds of a Feather Stick Together

There continues to be so much news on the Clinton front that it’s hard to keep up with it all. For instance, we now know that George Stephanopoulos, a supposed journalist who used to work for the Clintons and remains very tight with them, tried to hide the fact that when he conducted a critical interview with Peter Schweizer, the author of Clinton Cash, he was, in essence, still working for them. Stephanopoulos has contributed about $75,000 to the Clinton… Read more »

The Way Is Still Narrow

A flurry of news reports of late are touting polls that show fewer Americans identify as Christians. Good. We’re finally being honest. I mean, let’s get serious—more than 70% of Americans are really Christians? Don’t misunderstand me. I’m just as concerned about the decline in public profession of Christian faith as anyone, but there’s a clear difference between some type of acknowledgement of a vague definition of Christianity and the real thing. In the past, it always helped to call… Read more »

A College Education

In honor of all the college graduates who have walked across that stage in the past few weeks, I present a Mallard Fillmore running commentary on the state of higher education in America. Lest you get the wrong idea, I’m hardly opposed to a college education. After all, I’ve been teaching at that level for the past 26 years. I am opposed, though, to any college education that is not college level, thereby offering no real education at all. Sadly,… Read more »

Lewis: The Vulnerability of Love

In C. S. Lewis’s excellent book The Four Loves, he issues this warning to those who try to shield themselves from love because they are afraid of being hurt. It won’t go well for them, for there are unintended consequences: To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not… Read more »

The Eisenhower Decade

I am in Abilene, Kansas, researching at the Dwight Eisenhower Presidential Library. Spent all day there yesterday and will finish my research today. It’s rather sad that Eisenhower is practically a forgotten president for the current generation. Of course, I’ve often commented that students today know next to nothing about American history, but what they do know spans only their lifetime, or a portion of it. The Eisenhower decade was really rather prosperous for America, and he kept the peace… Read more »