Month: January 2015

Nobama

Of all the missteps in the Obama administration, none has so roundly raised the ire of people representing both sides of the political spectrum as his absence from the Paris unity march. As I said in a previous post, I’m not much for marches that are more symbol than substance, but sometimes symbolism is important enough to warrant participation. The outrage over our president’s seeming lack of concern over Islamic terrorism may be one of the best developments of the… Read more »

Of Salem & Witchcraft Trials

Perhaps the only thing some people know about Puritan history in America is that they executed presumed witches. Americans typically know nothing about how Puritans gave us our first constitution and bill of rights, but they are always told about the Salem witchcraft trials. How does one analyze this episode of Puritan history fairly? Of course, most historians automatically denigrate the Puritans for it because they operate on a naturalistic worldview that says belief in witches is a superstition of… Read more »

News Coverage: Fact vs. Fiction

Regular readers of this blog know that I periodically comment on the state of the media, whether for news or for entertainment. Sad to say, they often intersect. It’s no joy for me to point out the problems, particularly since my first degree was in radio, TV, and film production. I’ve always loved the media’s potential for being a benefit to society. Unfortunately, the media now, both in news and entertainment, seem more focused on agendas, and the most disturbing… Read more »

America’s Disappearing Act

The big news this weekend was the major march in Paris to show solidarity against terrorism. More than one million people showed up. Included in that assemblage were forty heads of state, even those who have issues with one another, such as Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel and Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas. One nation’s leader was noticeably absent. More on that in a minute. While I don’t want to downplay the significance of that many people showing up—and so many… Read more »

Writing Tips from C. S. Lewis

My intensive reading of C. S. Lewis letters is part of another of my sabbatical projects, with a book as the end goal. This has been no drudgery; rather, it has been fascinating to delve into them and see how Lewis responds to his American correspondents. Often, he writes to children who have read his Narnia books. One of his regular child correspondents was Joan Lancaster, who, for her age, was quite mature and thoughtful. Lewis seemed to take an… Read more »

Sabbatical Update: Texas

Periodically, I’ve been providing updates on my sabbatical year. Those of you who have kept up with this know I’m working on more than one project. One, though, has kept me moving across the country to different presidential libraries as I examine documents related to spiritual advisers to presidents. I’ve already gone to Wheaton College–back in August–and researched in the archives of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, since he is the premier spiritual adviser for a number of presidents since… Read more »

Our Executioner Awaits

As I continued to follow the news yesterday of the search for the Islamic terrorists in France, I wish I could say I was stunned by revelations of Western cluelessness. Unfortunately, I was not. Imitating President Obama, we now have a multitude of voices saying that Islamic terrorists are not really Islamic. And a chorus is arising—the same chorus we’ve heard on and off since 9/11—fearful that Americans will now persecute peace-loving Muslims in our midst. That “boy-cried-wolf” scenario, if… Read more »