Month: July 2014

The Pilgrim Story: A Faith-Full Decision

The Separatists/Pilgrims made it to Holland and were left alone by the government to worship as their consciences led. So why not stay there? Hadn’t they achieved what they desired? William Bradford, who became their governor at Plymouth for 35 years, was also the historian of the movement during that era. In his History of Plimoth Plantation, he lays out the reasons they decided Holland shouldn’t be their final destination. They were as follows: News of their hard life working… Read more »

The Incredible Shrinking President

Barack Obama has been a media creation from the start. All the hype was exactly that—image and public relations. Whatever substance did exist was birthed in the communist upbringing he received from his parents and grandparents, in the radical environs of Columbia and Harvard, and on the streets carrying out the subversive vision of Saul Alinsky. He also brought to the office of the presidency a disdain for the rule of law and the Constitution. The office he holds means… Read more »

Margaret Thatcher: Unintended Consequences

I’m taking my time reading through Margaret Thatcher’s The Path to Power, going one section at a time, as I try to increase my knowledge of the history of the United Kingdom in the late twentieth century. As I’ve followed her life from her time with her family, to her university years at Oxford, to her early political career, I’ve been fascinated with her observations of the era. I was struck particularly by a section of the book dealing with the… Read more »

Persecution of Christians: It’s Real

Persecution of Christians worldwide seems to be increasing. China is tearing down crosses. The Islamic regions either outlaw Christian evangelism (ex., Saudi Arabia) or are dominated by radical Islamists who seek to wipe out Christianity entirely. The poster child for this new persecution, sadly enough, is Iraq, where the U.S. has expended so much effort to turn that nation into a civilized ally. As the country falls apart, and sections of it are overpowered by the latest Islamist terror organization,… Read more »

Convictions in an Anti-God Culture

I’ve been reading evangelist Winkie Pratney’s book The Thomas Factor: Dealing with Doubt. Although it’s not necessarily intended as a devotional book, that’s the spirit in which I’m reading it, and so many of his comments and explanations have served to confirm what I already know and have challenged me to remain committed to the Truth. I was particularly impressed with his treatment of what it means to have deep conviction of belief. Here’s a sample: We are to take truth… Read more »

C. S. Lewis on the Second Coming of Christ

As a college student back in the 1970s, and caught up in the Jesus Movement of the era, I anticipated the Second Coming to be very near, probably sometime in the 1970s, of course. Even though I was spiritually immature at the time, that doesn’t mean the Second Coming is some kind of fantasy. As C. S. Lewis explains, it is essential to a proper understanding of the Christian faith. In an essay entitled “The World’s Last Night,” he had… Read more »

The Pilgrim Story: Convictions, Not Preferences

You’ve heard the cliché “actions speak louder than words.” The New Testament book of James puts it another way when it says that faith without works is dead. People may say they believe something, but you don’t know if it’s a real belief until you see if, under pressure, it holds solid. A few days ago, I began an examination of the English Separatists who eventually became known as the Pilgrims when they settled in America. How solid were their… Read more »