Tag: socialism

Baneful Effects of NEA-Led Education

Since it’s Labor Day, what better day to talk about one of the largest and most influential unions in the country—the National Education Association [NEA]. This also allows me to continue my intermittent history of American education. The NEA was founded in Philadelphia in 1857. The ostensible rationale for its creation was to provide a voice for all teachers in the nation to promote the interests of the profession. A statement from that initial meeting said it hoped to one… Read more »

Is This Our Future?

As the Obama administration pushes for this country to become more like a socialist European country, it might be fitting to look at what happens in those countries. The example used most often is economics, but I’d like to focus on something else this time. Let’s take Sweden, for instance. I’ve been to Sweden, and I enjoyed my visit [eleven years ago]. I loved the historical sites in particular. I certainly have nothing against the Swedish people. In fact, there… Read more »

Greece and America: See Any Similarities?

I haven’t said anything about Greece yet, so I guess it’s about time. In case you haven’t been following this, Greece is now a basket-case financially. How did it get that way? Its socialist policies have bankrupted it. Did you know the retirement age in Greece is about 53? Sounds good, some might say. No, we were made to be productive far beyond that age. All it did was create a massive entitlement that the government no longer can afford. You might… Read more »

The Dewey Factor (Part I)

Let’s take a break from purely political anaysis today. Instead, let’s look at one of the reasons we are where we are as a nation, and why some of our political problems exist. To do so, we need to recognize what has happened to our education system over the past 100+ years. We have to start with John Dewey, who has earned the title “Father of Progressive Education.” That “progressive” label is almost always poison. What were Dewey’s contributions to… Read more »