Tag: Santorum

No-Fault Freedom vs. Responsible Liberty

“Conservatives,” says Rick Santorum in his book It Takes a Family, “are the caretakers of a precious inheritance.” That inheritance rests on stable families. Yet the “village elders,” a name he gives to the liberal social engineers who operate in the spirit of Hillary Clinton’s tome It Takes a Village, don’t really care about stable families. It the family structure were to prevail, it would rob the village elders of their self-appointed role as the redesigners of America from on… Read more »

Santorum: Liberal & Conservative Visions Contrasted

I said yesterday that I would begin analyzing Rick Santorum’s book It Takes a Family. I’ve completed about one-third of the book already because I’ve found it to be a compelling read. Before getting into specifics, I have some general comments: First, I am finding this book to be a serious discussion of principles and policies related to those principles. It is not a piece of campaign fluff. In fact, since it was published in 2005, it hardly was written… Read more »

It Takes a Family: The Santorum Political Philosophy

Lately, I’ve been drawn to Rick Santorum’s candidacy for the presidency. As I mentioned in a previous post, I had dismissed his chances from the start. But after seeing the weaknesses of the other candidates, even before he came in second in Iowa, I was beginning to view him differently. The more I’ve learned, the more I like. Since I’ve paid close attention to politics for nearly four decades now, I already was familiar with some of Santorum’s background. I… Read more »

Principles & the Presidential Race

I’m very disappointed in Newt Gingrich. I was looking seriously at his candidacy for a while. I respect his intellect, and I was giving the benefit of the doubt that he may have changed from earlier years. I am not a supporter of Mitt Romney, as regular readers of this blog can attest. Yet the attack Newt has delivered on Romney’s years as a venture capitalist smacks of pure opportunism. He knows full well that a venture capitalist takes over… Read more »

Foolish Reasoning?

New Hampshire went for Mitt Romney last night. Not exactly a surprise. He owns a home there; he’s pretty much been campaigning there since the 2008 election. And New Hampshire is not Iowa. Approximately 26% of New Hampshire residents have no religious affiliation whatsoever, which is above the national average. Further, the primary process allowed anyone to participate as a Republican, even if just for a day. That’s why Romney could rack up a substantial score, as a number of… Read more »

The Santorum Surprise

Eight votes. That’s all that separated Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum once the Iowa caucuses ended. Technically, Romney was the winner, but one has to excuse Santorum for feeling as if he took the prize. Two weeks ago, no one saw this in the making; one week ago, though polls showed a Santorum surge, few could have guessed it would turn out this way. Even the speeches given by both at the end of a long night marked the contrast:… Read more »

The Current Crop of Contenders

As a historian, I believe I’m somewhat prepared for less than perfection. I mean, in studying history, one realizes that the really principled people are fewer than they should be, and that we have to settle, more often than not, for less than the ideal. That applies to policies and people. As I ponder the lineup of contenders for the Republican nomination this year, I’m reminded of that historical lesson. The two top prospects that I had counted on running… Read more »