The Ridiculous and the Absurd

Pirates were in the news last week. Who would have guessed? Happily, the Navy Seals were able to rescue the captain of the ship that was attacked, in the process taking out three of the four pirates. The remaining one will be put on trial. Perhaps you’ve seen him on the news, grinning like he’s enjoying it. Well, now that he’s in the hands of the American criminal justice system, maybe he has reason to grin. After all, he’s part… Read more »

American Character: Pocahontas

To some, she is the stuff of legend. Perhaps that’s why Disney felt comfortable making a film that is largely fantasy. First, she was not an alluring young woman when she met Capt. John Smith; she was about ten years old. Fantasy is at work also in the image of John Smith here. Pocahontas was fascinated with these English settlers. She spent time at the fort playing with the young boys. Her father, Chief Powhatan, didn’t mind her visiting his… Read more »

Ill Effects of the First 100 "Daze"

Everyone is opining about Obama’s first 100 days, as if that is some kind of magic number. There’s that FDR comparison again. Isn’t it about time for another Lincoln one? I’m not going to expend a lot of energy today trying to sum up those 100 days (or is it “daze”?). I have used postings over the past three months to let you know what I am thinking. However, I did read a couple of excellent opinion pieces in National Review… Read more »

American Character: Chanco

Most of you probably looked at the name in the title above and said, “Who is that?” Character is not found only among the well known; it appears in those we might call “the common man” as well. I call Chanco an example of American character even though he was not one of the early English settlers. Rather, he was a native American, one already living here when the English arrived. The backdrop: Jamestown was 15 years young in 1622…. Read more »

The Height of Foolishness

This week, the Obama administration released top secret documents that outlined the interrogation tactics used by the U.S. on captured terrorists. The administration has defined loud music, sleep deprivation, and a slap on the face as “torture.” This is a tortured definition. The outcry from the intelligence community has been vociferous. Release of these details will let terrorists know what to expect and how to prepare. The worst action was “waterboarding,” which makes a person feel like he is drowning…. Read more »

Sometimes They Say It All

I’ve been extremely busy lately, making it more difficult to carve out the time for thoughtful postings. Fortunately, political cartoons can come to the rescue. At times, they are all you need to underscore a point. For instance, on Obama’s recent trip to Europe and the Middle East, this is an excellent commentary: And for the media’s superb coverage of the trip: No sooner did Obama leave the eastern hemisphere than he arrived at the summit of the Americas, where… Read more »

American Character: Capt. John Smith

I spent a few days posting on the principle of Christian character. Throughout American history, there have been individuals who have exhibited certain of those traits and, by them, have contributed greatly to our history. Some of those people may not have been Christians themselves, except in the cultural sense, but they still exemplify the qualities that are essential for a society to work. One such man was Capt. John Smith—soldier, adventurer, mapmaker of the New World. One of Smith’s… Read more »