Scrapping the Obamacare Monstrosity

Anyone who thinks history doesn’t repeat itself has a short memory. It seems as if we have a scenario that never goes away: the federal government in gridlock as we attempt to keep it funded. Each time, there are cries of horror that children will starve, the elderly will perish, we won’t meet our debt obligations, and the world, generally speaking, will come to an end. All such cries are overwrought and largely political.

We also repeat the scenario that the public will blame Republicans for this state of affairs. Never mind that the Republican-dominated House has passed a resolution funding 99% of the government’s expenses; all attention is on the 1%—Obamacare. Yes, technically it is the law, manipulated through a Congress at one time controlled completely by Democrats via quid pro quo promises to certain Democrat senators. Yes, the Supreme Court, in one of its most infamous decisions, comparable to Dred Scott and Roe v. Wade, found a way to declare it constitutional. But even the president whose name is attached to it doesn’t treat it as a law. Without any legal authority at all, he has postponed sections of it and granted exemptions to people of his choosing—including Congress itself.

The president is in campaign mode—well, he never actually left that mode—to convince the public that Obamacare is good for them. You know, like that castor oil you dreaded taking each morning. It’s a hard sell, especially when the public sees all those exemptions, the chaos surrounding the setup of “exchanges,” the number of companies dropping insurance or lowering their workers’ hours to part-time to avoid the mandate, and the increasing costs of healthcare due to the requirements of the law. Some people have seen their premiums triple. The only states where there appears to be any good news on the cost are those already with the highest premiums. Now the rest of the nation can join their misery.

Can the public really be blamed for having second thoughts about this? Why should any government have to go to great lengths to advertise something that supposedly already is enacted? Well, they know it’s becoming wildly unpopular:

Ad Campaign

Tomorrow the Obamacare exchanges are supposed to go into effect. In January, the entire law—minus the exemptions and postponements—is slated to be in force. The whole enterprise is already the cause of greater costs and unemployment. And the Republicans are going to be blamed? That’s kind of an upside-down perception. This Obamacare launch isn’t exactly going the way its dreamers predicted:

Launch

If we are a nation of clear vision, we will encourage the Republican effort to scrap this monstrosity. But are we such a nation? The jury is still out.