It Takes a Family: The Santorum Political Philosophy

Lately, I’ve been drawn to Rick Santorum’s candidacy for the presidency. As I mentioned in a previous post, I had dismissed his chances from the start. But after seeing the weaknesses of the other candidates, even before he came in second in Iowa, I was beginning to view him differently. The more I’ve learned, the more I like.

Since I’ve paid close attention to politics for nearly four decades now, I already was familiar with some of Santorum’s background. I knew he was considered a conservative, and I had many reasons to be pleased with his stances, particularly his steadfastness on pro-life. I still distinctly remember, though, his endorsement of Arlen Specter for reelection as senator from Pennsylvania, despite a distinctly more conservative challenger. I was dismayed that Santorum would turn his back on someone who was more in line with his own beliefs. Yet I understood, to some extent—Specter had supported him, so it was expected he would return the favor.

That incident was incongruous with his overall record, and I was disappointed when he lost his reelection bid in 2006, but he wasn’t the only one to do so in that very bad year for Republicans.

The Florida primary is two weeks away. At this point, I will be voting for Santorum because I believe he has far more positives than negatives.

I desire to learn more about his basic philosophy of government and culture, so I ordered the book he authored a few years ago, It Takes a Family: Conservatism and the Common Good. I have begun reading it so I will have a better grasp of his principles and goals. As I venture further into it, I’ll report back on what I find.

So if you are interested in knowing more about Santorum and his beliefs, and especially if you are in South Carolina or Florida, you might want to check back on this blog the rest of this week, and probably beyond, as I offer a synopsis of Santorum’s political philosophy.