Pseudo-Intellectualism

There are some Americans who have an inferiority complex [please excuse me for using Freudian terminology—although I think he was wrong on almost everything, this term does seem to apply]. They think that America is always behind the times, backward, and just not on the cutting edge of sophistication. For some reason, they believe that Europe is the standard for all things, so we need to change our ways and become more like Europe.

Has anyone noticed that a lot of European governments are going broke?

We’re walking right into that same “trap.” There is now a revival, under President Obama, of Keynesian economics, which says that the government must spend money to create prosperity. The more you spend, the more prosperous you will be is the motto of this administration. Try that at home sometime and see how you fare.

It’s fascinating to me that we admire thinkers who don’t really have any contact with reality. One of my favorite books is Paul Johnson’s Intellectuals. His theme in that book is that before you follow a self-identified intellectual’s ideas, it might be good to look first at that person’s life. If he is a mess, maybe he doesn’t really know what he’s talking about.

A better word for some of these self-styled intellectuals might be “pseudo-intellectual.” How can you recognize them? Here’s one way:

There is a genuine intellectualism. It is grounded in reality, which is itself grounded in a Biblical framework for thinking. Biblical principles, when they form the basis for how we think, will help us use the minds God gave us in the proper fashion.