Man’s Anger & God’s Righteousness

James 1:20—For the anger of man does not achieve the righteousness of God.

That Scripture came to mind this morning as I reflect on the state of our nation and the political developments in recent years.

Proverbs 29Anger over sin is not a sin in itself, but whenever anger becomes the driving force for what one does, we go off the rails spiritually.

There are legitimate reasons for anger:

  • Over 57 million babies aborted since the Roe v. Wade decision in 1973;
  • The ongoing destruction of Biblical morality in the area of sexual relations and marriage;
  • The assault on religious liberty, particularly for conservative Christians;
  • The trend toward the government as the solution for all problems;
  • The arrogance and increasing corruption of political leaders;
  • The overthrowing of the rule of law in general.

Those are the ones that come readily to mind, but there are others.

How has the Christian community responded? Some have taken a bold stand against this cultural and political devolution; others have caved to the spirit of the age and have tailored their “Christianity” to fit the new trends.

Politically, starting in 2009, a movement arose—and many in the movement were Christians—that sought to reverse some of these trends. Anger helped begin that movement, but it also was focused on a return to basics, both spiritually and constitutionally.

DSC00018For that reason, I was pleased to participate in it. It was given a name: the Tea Party. I have spoken to a number of such groups since their inception, and have done my best to help this movement stay on track by pointing to the principles we need to follow.

What I’m about to say is not an indictment of the movement as a whole because I know enough sincere, honest people who are part of it. However, what I’ve witnessed over time is a tendency to allow anger over what is occurring in the nation to overwhelm the more positive aspects of the movement.

Whenever we let anger dictate our responses, we lose. When we drift away from concentrating on the positive message of restoration and humility before God, seeking His mercy, we lose.

Instead, we latch onto a charismatic figure who only fans the flames of the anger we naturally feel. We overlook his character, his past, and even the things he says that are completely inconsistent with what we claim are our principles.

In the heat of our anger, we lose our souls.

I am just sad this morning. I am now a political outsider. I often feel like one of those lonely voices in the wilderness. It’s not a comfortable place to be.

Yet I am willing to be what God has called me to be. I am willing to continue to speak and write what I believe to be true. And because I also believe that God is a God of mercy as well as discipline and judgment, I continue to hope for the best.

LamentationsIn the face of God’s judgment over His people Israel in the Old Testament, the prophet Jeremiah stated this in the book of Lamentations:

This I recall to my mind; therefore I have hope. The Lord’s lovingkindnesses indeed never cease, for His compassions never fail. They are new every morning.

Great is Your faithfulness. “The Lord is my portion,” says my soul. “Therefore I have hope in Him.”

That’s the only safe place for our hope to reside: in Him. There is no political savior. We will survive the results of this coming election only because there is hope in Him.

Lay aside the anger as your primary motivation. Look to Him instead.

James 1:20—For the anger of man does not achieve the righteousness of God.

The Duggars, the Media, & Salvation

I’d really rather not write about this today. I’m concerned that what I write may be misunderstood. However, because I believe in the life-changing power of faith in Christ, I have to say this.

Duggar FamilyThe news media seems to have zeroed in on the latest example of hypocrisy in the Christian world—or what they deem to be hypocrisy—by focusing with laser-like aim on the Duggar family. Let me say from the outset that I have never watched their program and had little knowledge of them prior to the current frenzy over what one of their sons did to some of his sisters when he was a teenager. I was aware that some who hate the idea of a large family, and one that promotes Christian faith at that, were critical of them. I had no idea just how venomous that criticism would be now that some—I emphasize “some”—facts have come out.

What did this son do? It’s sketchy. Two of his sisters are going public to deny most of the allegations floating around. They certainly don’t seem to have been traumatized, and they appear to want to set the record straight. Are they victims who don’t really understand their victimhood? The professionals are already jumping on that bandwagon.

There’s another possibility. The son, in deep remorse for what he did, might have gotten his life straightened out through the transforming power of the Holy Spirit. From what I read, he has a fine marriage now. He even told his bride-to-be ahead of time what he had done as a teenager, but that he received forgiveness from God and has walked in His ways since then.

Now, I don’t know for sure if that’s true. But here’s what is most bothersome about the whole episode: the critics will never believe it is true, no matter how much proof can be brought forward to affirm it. They think “once a sex offender, always a sex offender.” There’s some validity to that view, since recidivism in that realm is high. Yet if we, as Christians, don’t believe God can turn a life around, perhaps we should stop saying He does.

I want to give the family time to make their case. I also want to know why those sealed juvenile records were released when it is against the law to do so. What agenda is at work here? Is this another attempt by the anti-Christian forces in the nation to undermine the faith?

Any type of sexual harassment or abuse is sin. Christians are clear on that. Let’s just be sure we have all the facts first, though, before we cast our stones. Jesus’ words to the woman caught in adultery still ring: Go and sin no more. If the Duggar son has taken Jesus’ words to heart and lived his life since then on that basis, we should be rejoicing in a transformed life, not digging up old dirt.

Jesus came to call sinners to repentance. He came to bring eternal life to those who don’t deserve it. That applies to all of us. When we come to repentance and receive His forgiveness and our hearts are changed, that’s called salvation.

Judgment Begins with the Household of God

I don’t know much about Shorter University in Rome, Georgia. What I do know is what I read yesterday—that it’s a Christian university associated with the Georgia Baptist Convention and that it has decided to be consistent with that convention’s beliefs by asking its employees to sign a pledge indicating their agreement with the basic tenets of the church. To me, that’s only common sense. If you say “this is what we believe and this is what we seek to teach our students,” you should expect your professors and other staff to be in concert with your goals.

The pledge, though, has now become a center of controversy. More than fifty professors and staff have resigned rather than sign it. Why? What awful points of doctrine and/or practice are included? Here’s what university employees must agree to:

  • No homosexual lifestyle
  • No pre-marital sex
  • No adultery
  • No drug use
  • Be an active member of a church
  • Live as committed, Bible-believing followers of Jesus Christ

My, how oppressive! A Christian university actually expecting their employees, including professors who are supposed to be teaching within a Biblical worldview, to live as Christians! [Note: I don’t usually go overboard using exclamation points, but they seemed to apply this time.]

Let’s keep in mind this is a private Christian university that has the authority to set up whatever ground rules it considers appropriate. Not being involved in sexual immorality and not being a druggie would seem to me to be minimum requirements for any institution that claims to be Christian. Yet, as can be expected, this has created a firestorm.

What bothers me the most about this is that some of those who resigned had been there for many years. One of the librarians was openly homosexual. This university doesn’t seem to have cared a whole lot about its Christian commitment for quite some time. By being lax in its internal discipline, it opened the door for the current controversy. If it had been consistently Christian from the start, this would be no big deal now. Therefore, it is now suffering the consequences of its previous policies.

All that said, I congratulate the university now for its attempt to set things straight, so to speak. But this is an object lesson for all Christian colleges and universities: be warned—you may go through a similar rough patch if you aren’t being faithful to Biblical standards now. We need to keep in mind these bracing words from the apostle Peter:

For it is time for judgment to begin with the household of God; and if it begins with us first, what will be the outcome for those who do not obey the gospel of God?

Indeed.