Sabbatical Update: Texas

Periodically, I’ve been providing updates on my sabbatical year. Those of you who have kept up with this know I’m working on more than one project. One, though, has kept me moving across the country to different presidential libraries as I examine documents related to spiritual advisers to presidents.

I’ve already gone to Wheaton College–back in August–and researched in the archives of the Billy Graham Evangelistic Association, since he is the premier spiritual adviser for a number of presidents since WWII. Then I traveled to California and spent time at both the Reagan and Nixon libraries.

This past week I’ve been in Texas, continuing my research at the LBJ and George H. W. Bush libraries. Both of these presidents were close to Graham, and LBJ also had a couple other spiritual advisers I looked into as well.

Let me just give you a few impressions.

The LBJ Library, in Austin, is on the campus of the University of Texas. It is nothing like the Reagan Library (which remains my favorite, not only because of the president himself but also because of the beauty of the place and the immensity and quality of the museum). My first view of it was this:

LBJ Library

I certainly don’t wish to be overly critical. One could say it is majestic, I guess, but to me it appeared like a big block of concrete—massive, forbidding, almost like a fortress. Well, that may be just me. You can come to your own conclusions.

The museum portion had its highlights, but nothing as grand, in my view, as what I experienced at the Reagan Library. There was one “grand” view, however, that was worth noting:

Stacks-Front

They decided to showcase some of the archives behind the scenes. Going up this staircase, one can get some idea of the enormity of the collection. This is only a portion of it.

While in Austin, I also took in the Texas State History Museum.

TX State History Museum

I’ve heard that everything in Texas is big, or at least purports to be. This museum fits the stereotype, from its three-level staircase in the lobby to its nearly breathtaking view from the top level.

TX Museum-Interior 2

TX Museum-Interior 1

I want to pause here and offer a word of gratitude to the Texas State Trooper who decided to have a little talk with me after I went the wrong way on a one-way street. I didn’t see the sign, told him I was a newcomer (never been in Austin before), and was there to do presidential research. He asked what I was researching and seemed interested when I mentioned Billy Graham. He let me off with a warning. Yes, I am grateful (and will be more alert to one-way street signs in downtown areas in the future).

My next stop was College Station, and the campus of Texas A&M, where the George H. W. Bush Library is located.

Bush Library-Front

This library looked much more inviting. I also didn’t have any encounters with one-way streets. I like College Station.

The lobby was pretty grand.

Bush Library Lobby 2

The exhibits were excellent throughout and catch one’s attention right away.

Bush Portrait

Quotes from Bush are liberally scattered throughout. There were some I particularly liked, such as this one after he went down in the Pacific during WWII:

Bush-God Quote

While there, I decided to get a little work done, so I looked around for a desk I could use. I found one:

Bush Oval Office 3

Please don’t tell anybody.

That’s the travelogue side. Most of my time, of course, was spent poring through papers. I found a lot of fine documents that should help my colleague and me put together what we want to say about these presidents. I came away with a little more grudging admiration for LBJ, not in policy matters (where I disagree with his entire Great Society program), but simply for what he had to go through in a turbulent time. I’m not convinced, however, that his faith was genuine. One’s life must match one’s talk.

As for Bush, my appreciation for him was strengthened. I’ve always considered him to be a decent man, but I’m more convinced than ever that his Christian faith was the real thing. I have policy disagreements with what he did as well, but I want to give some leeway and offer praise for his strong family ethic, which can be seen in the way his sons honor him today.

Bush is now in his nineties and his health is declining. When he passes, the nation will have lost a true Christian gentleman.

I’m not yet sure when and where my next trip will take place, but when it does, another update will be coming your way.

Sabbatical Update: Lewis Edition

Many of my regular readers know I’m on a sabbatical this year, and I’ve been alert to provide periodic updates on the progress of my various endeavors. Recently, I posted photos of my time at the Reagan and Nixon libraries and the Reagan Ranch as I research on the topic of spiritual advisers to presidents. The hope is that will turn into a series of books with my Southeastern colleague, Dr. Robert Crosby.

C. S. Lewis 7I’m also deeply involved with a study of C. S. Lewis’s influence on Americans. I would like to author a book on that particular topic, since no one has ever done it. I have a literary agent who is working with me on the book proposal. A major blessing has been the e-mail communication I’ve had with Rev. Walter Hooper, who served as Lewis’s personal secretary during the author’s final months of life. Rev. Hooper then has gone on to be the primary representative for keeping Lewis’s writings in print for the last five decades. His help in providing personal information on his relationship with Lewis has been invaluable.

20140804_184024I’ve mentioned before how the Wade Center at Wheaton College has come alongside to aid in my research. Wade has the largest collection of Lewis papers and books by and about him in America. The Center featured on its website and Facebook page my appeal for testimonies from Americans on how Lewis has influenced their thinking and their lives. Again, as with Rev. Hooper’s assistance, the Wade Center’s willingness to work with me on my research has greatly encouraged me to continue this project.

I’m also reading through the 3-volume collection of Lewis’s personal correspondence, pulling out all letters he wrote to Americans and making extensive notes on them. One might think such a task would reek of drudgery, but it has been quite the opposite. Lewis’s lively words practically fly off the pages and into my heart and mind.

So I’m optimistic that my Lewis research is progressing well. I would like to thank those of you who participated in my survey on the Wade Center site. It’s not too late to do so if you have been considering it but just haven’t gotten around to it yet. I want as many testimonies as possible.

You can access the survey by going to this link: http://www.wheaton.edu/wadecenter/News-and-Events

Scroll down to the announcement titled “C. S. Lewis’s American Influence Survey” and simply click on “Take the Survey.” Your contribution would be greatly appreciated.

As you can tell, I continue to be excited by the opportunities I have during this sabbatical year. Please pray for them to come to fruition.