Remember the scene a couple of weeks ago as the Democratic House leadership left one of the House office buildings to walk outside to the Capitol? Speaker Pelosi was carrying a rather huge gavel.

They were in an exultant mood—healthcare was about to pass. This march was obviously intended to go straight through the crowd of protestors who were begging Congress not to pass the bill.

It was during this march that an alleged incident occurred. Accusations later were lodged against the protestors for using racial slurs against African American congressmen. The accusations received eager coverage in the media. Suddenly the “Tea Partiers” were racist degenerates, not concerned citizens trying to stop their nation’s slide into financial ruin.

Fighting back, one conservative leader, Andrew Breitbart, has offered to pay the United Negro College Fund $100,000 for any video proving the allegations of racist language being used that day. Video cameras were everywhere. Breitbart is still waiting for the smoking gun video that proves the accusations are true.

A game is being played here.

With a little help from their media  friends, the Democrats hope to smear honest protest with the dreaded label of racism. They don’t have to look far to find those helpful media people. They’re already well trained and prepared to stereotype.

Honest reporting is a rarity.

And what of that “march”? Why did it even occur? Representatives never do that. They always use the underground tunnels that take them directly from their offices to the Capitol. They knew the grounds were filled with protestors. Could this have been a deliberate attempt to create controversy? It has become obvious they don’t really know what to do with those who are involved with the Tea Party movement. They’re not sure how to counteract their appeal. So why not brand them racists?

It’s an underhanded and deceptive strategy. But they’re practically beside themselves trying to figure out what to do.

On April 15—tax day—tea parties will be held all across America. I plan to attend one—my first.

And I am not a racist.