The Greatest Threats

Well, I’m sure glad President Obama spoke to the American people the other night and assured us he is on the job against Islamic terrorism. He was quite direct in how he was adjusting his strategy to deal with this issue: no adjustment necessary.

So what did you hear if you watched his little speech? Probably the same thing most of us heard.

Yadda

Nothing In It

What we did learn, though, is that Americans can’t be trusted with guns and that more gun control laws will stop terrorism. Can’t wait to see how that works, can you?

In Violation

Check Gun Laws

We also received a scolding on our attitudes toward Muslims, which seems to be the greatest threat now to the nation, in his estimation. I guess it’s all those “hate crimes” committed against Muslims ever since 9/11. We’re just so intolerant that all Muslims now feel threatened by our hostility toward them.

Right. All the crime statistics say otherwise. Most of the catalogued hate crimes are against Jews, not Muslims, and from my perspective, it’s the Christians who are now in the crosshairs, especially from this administration.

Do you ever wonder how Obama would have responded if he had been president and 9/11 occurred on his watch?

Box Cutter Epidemic

We could also project him back into another massive historical attack, one that we commemorated just a few days ago. In fact, some cartoonists have done just that. Here’s their perspective:

Mass Shooting Pearl Harbor

What If

The greatest external threat to America is Islamic jihadism. The greatest internal threat resides at 1600 Pennsylvania Ave. in Washington, DC.

Introducing Barack Chamberlain Obama

Rudy Giuliani got himself in hot water with the Obama media a few days ago when he declared that he doesn’t think Obama loves America. It’s fascinating how a media that doesn’t seem to have much love for America itself jumped all over that statement. And of course they then tried to tie that to Scott Walker, asking him if he thought Obama loved America. He made a smart move politically, not directly affirming what Giuliani said, but not forthrightly renouncing him either.

It probably wasn’t the best move on Giuliani’s part to say it the way he did. As one commentator noted, quoting Scripture, “by their fruits you will know them.” Far better to point to the One’s actions and/or inactions as evidence of where his heart is.

For instance, he can’t bring himself to say that what we’re battling is really connected to Islam. He won’t blame Islamists for anything. Yet when three Muslims are killed in North Carolina, over what local officials say was a parking dispute, he immediately inserts himself into the situation, warning against a climate of Islamophobia:

It's About Religion

We’re supposed to ignore, of course, that the murderer is an atheist, a supporter of gay marriage, and in every way possible, a man who probably would have voted for Obama. No, this has to be about people who hate Islam—in the president’s mind.

He really goes out of his way to absolve Islam from any blame for atrocities. His wording at times is downright ludicrous:

Pen Is Mightier

Since he blames the West for the “grievances” of those who become terrorists, he rather simple-mindedly believes that if we give them more money and make them feel secure with jobs, all this nastiness will magically go away. One cartoonist recently gave his suggestion on the kinds of jobs we could offer the terrorists:

ISIS Employment

There are historical precedents/similarities that I see here. In the 1930s, most of the Western world fooled itself into believing that Hitler was a problem that could be controlled. He had “legitimate grievances” that could be addressed, and once they were, he would cease being aggressive. British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain infamously sold out the Czechs in the Munich agreement in 1938. All that did was spur Hitler on to greater expansion of his power. We have a new Neville Chamberlain today.

Man in Mirror

I fear that if we have another modern-day Pearl Harbor, our president’s response will be something like this:

Edited

By the way, I’m predicting another Pearl Harbor/9/11 event. If it occurs on Obama’s watch, we will be in dire straits.

Islam and Political Correctness

Is rational discussion at an all-time low? Has political correctness gotten so out of control that no one is allowed to criticize Islam? One might be excused for thinking so after the temper tantrum on The View Thursday. Why anyone would watch The View is beyond me, but sometimes it does have a guest who challenges the liberal worldview.

It was Bill O’Reilly’s turn Thursday to cause the ladies to nearly faint from shock. In a discussion that led to O’Reilly saying that most people don’t want that Ground Zero mosque to be built, he reminded his hosts that it was Muslims who killed nearly 3000 Americans on 9/11.

You would have thought he had uttered something akin to “Adolf Hitler was a nice guy.” The response was immediate and frantic. How dare he say Muslims were responsible for 9/11? He should have added the word “extremists” to be clear. Now, if they had said that in a normal tone, perhaps he would have clarified. Instead, they huffed and they puffed and two of the hosts, Whoopi Goldberg and Joy Behar (both known for antagonistic comments about Christians), walked off the set.

As O’Reilly later commented on his own show, when Pearl Harbor was attacked in 1941, we didn’t refer to the attackers as extremist Japanese. We merely identified the group responsible. The same is true when we say that Muslims attacked the United States in 2001. Obviously, not all Muslims did so, but the statement is accurate. A group fueled by Islamic beliefs committed those acts. That is the truth, and we should be allowed to say so.

I’m continually amazed—almost amused—by some people’s nearly rabid fear that we are offending Muslims. How many American Muslims have been attacked by the general population? How many have died by rampaging mobs enraged by the events of 9/11? Right.

Yet around the world, reactions against any word of criticism toward Islam can yield spontaneous riots. I know there are moderate Muslims, but they seem to be rather silent. Afraid, perhaps, of reprisals from their “brethren”?

I believe Islam is a false religion. Yet I don’t attack Muslims. What I seek is to lead them into the truth of a relationship with God through Christ, the Son of God. I want to see them enter into the only kingdom that will last forever.

There are two types of diversity. The first comes from God, and is represented by the many variations within the human race, whether of skin color or whatever other natural differences one wishes to mention. God is a God of variety.

The other type of diversity wants to celebrate differences that are not natural, but the result of differing beliefs. You have to be more careful with this type of celebration:

Some differences can be lethal.

A 9/11 Remembrance and Reflection

On the morning of September 11th, 2001, I was on my way to Patrick Henry College where I was a professor of history. Before arriving at the college, I stopped at a gas station. One of the other customers came up to me and informed me in a rather vague way that a plane had hit a building in New York City. I have to admit that didn’t sound all that bad to me—I assumed it was a small plane, I had no idea it was the World Trade Center, and I had no reason to believe it affected me in any direct way.

Yet his manner indicated there might be something more to it, so I turned on the car radio to find out if this was anything significant. Reports were sketchy, but I gradually realized it was bigger than I thought. When I got to the college, a prayer meeting already had begun over the incident, but we were largely in the dark about details. One of the problems was that there was no television in any of the rooms where we could watch the drama unfold. Trying to get news on the Internet also was difficult—it seemed to have slowed to a crawl.

My wife was on her way to a store close to Dulles Airport, but she soon grasped the enormity of the situation when all the stores began to close for the day. Of course, the plane that smashed into the Pentagon took off from Dulles that morning. That made it even more real; we used Dulles for our flights all the time. It made our next trip to Dulles for a flight a little more sobering.

I didn’t see any video of the actual events until sometime in the afternoon. Then I was glued to the television for hours. Living just outside the DC area made us feel more vulnerable than if we had been in our home state of Indiana, for instance.

For me, what took place that day was literally an act of war. I recall saying that to my American history class. This really was the modern Pearl Harbor, only worse. Few Americans in 1941 were aware of what Pearl Harbor was and Hawaii was not yet a state. In 2001, everyone knew New York, and the image of the Twin Towers was quite familiar.

Now they were no more—destroyed by an enemy that wanted to take down the one nation that stood in its way as it sought to impose its religious ideology on everyone.

The unity at the time seemed real. Flags appeared everywhere. Congressmen and senators stood on the steps of the Capitol and sang “God Bless America.” Yet I never was convinced the unity was genuine, and with each passing day that put 9/11 further from our minds, my analysis proved correct.

Rather than viewing this as an act of war, the political Left shifted ground and thought of it as merely a crime to be handled through the judicial system. Today, there is little understanding on the Left of the true nature of the evil that exists in radical Islam. They are more concerned with being sensitive to the extremists and not making them angry.

Here is what the Left needs to understand: they are inherently angry, and nothing we do will satisfy that anger. They will stop at nothing to try to destroy those they hate. And they hate us.

The false ideology that dominates the political Left blinds them to the false ideology that seeks to devour them. I’m reminded of a poignant quote from Whittaker Chambers in his classic book Witness as he tried to warn the society of his day about the evil of communism:

The dying world of 1925 was without faith, hope, character, understanding of its malady or will to overcome it. It was dying but it laughed. And this laughter was not the defiance of a vigor that refuses to know when it is whipped. It was the loss, by the mind of a whole civilization, of the power to distinguish between reality and unreality, because, ultimately, though I did not know it, it had lost the power to distinguish between good and evil. … The dying world had no answer at all to the crisis of the 20th century, and, when it was mentioned, and every moral voice in the Western world was shrilling crisis, it cocked an ear of complacent deafness and smiled a smile of blank senility—throughout history, the smile of those for whom the executioner waits.

Are we at that same place today?

At Southeastern University, where I currently teach, a group of students from the College Republicans planted 2977 American flags in the ground to commemorate those who died on 9/11. It was a moving sight.

Not many people showed up for the remembrance, but those who came felt it deeply. The sad thing is that the new crop of college freshmen has no real significant memories of that day. They were too young to be impacted in the way I was. What does this portend for the future? I will do my part to remind them that an enemy does still exist and that the price of liberty is eternal vigilance. I only hope they are open to that message.