Trump’s New Math

Donald Trump apparently has been scoring in the polls by constantly claiming the rules for winning have been rigged. Some have pointed out that it is true: Trump has won 37% of the vote but has more than 40% of the delegates.

That’s probably not what he means. But it’s the truth.

He’s also come up with a new type of math. He declares that even if he doesn’t get to 1,237 delegates, he should be given the nomination anyway because he is ahead. Although the rules—you know, that unfair, rigged system—say a candidate must have a majority, not merely a plurality, of the delegates.

Special Ed

You know what else is unfair? You have to win by two points in tennis.

Win By Two

I remember, from my youth, one tennis pro who always complained, whined, and threw tantrums. His name was John McEnroe. I’m getting those same vibes as I watch Trump play the political game today:

Trumpenroe

Some people are all uptight over a contested convention. They seem not to realize that contested conventions used to be the norm. And they produced some good nominees.

10 Contested

The only thing that makes a contested convention this year a potential problem is that if Trump loses, he and his followers may create havoc, thereby making it a very difficult path for the one who eventually gets the nomination.

When Ted Cruz calls Trump’s outbursts Trumpertantrums, he is speaking more truth than has emanated from the Trump camp this entire campaign season. Frankly, Trump is an embarrassment, morally and politically.

Please don’t fall for this walking unreality show. Take this election seriously.

Why I Support Ted Cruz

Ted Cruz at KS CaucusIn this heated Republican nomination battle, I wholeheartedly support Ted Cruz. My support is not, as others have indicated, a choice between two flawed candidates; rather, I firmly believe Cruz is a committed Christian constitutional conservative who seeks to reverse the course of the last seven years.

My first knowledge of Cruz was in 2012 when he ran for the nomination for the Senate in his home state of Texas. His Republican opponent was the sitting lieutenant governor, David Dewhurst. Cruz startled the political world with his upset victory. Today, Dewhurst has endorsed his once-rival for the Republican presidential nomination, stating, “I want to make sure that we have a good conservative in the White House next January.”

Although a first-term senator, Cruz has taken a leadership role against the Obama agenda, much to the chagrin of the Republican leadership in that legislative body. I’m not sure his tactics have always been the best, but I can excuse failed tactics when I perceive that someone’s principles are solid; at least he, unlike most of his Republican colleagues, attempted to roll back Obamacare.

Cruz also once stood in the Senate and accused Mitch McConnell of lying to his fellow Republican senators, saying that McConnell had gone back on a promise not to make a certain deal with Obama. That earned Cruz McConnell’s enmity but showed he was willing to challenge his own leadership on the issue of integrity.

When he was the first Republican to announce his candidacy, and he did so at Liberty University, I admit I wondered if that was a political stunt designed to hoodwink conservative Christians. Now I believe it was a sincere effort to let that voting bloc know just who he is and what he wants to do as president. I also believe it was a wise move, as it provided a jumpstart to a campaign few saw as ready for prime time.

As Cruz stood on the stage in the debates that followed, surrounded by sixteen other candidates, it took a while for him to carve out his message—too many voices. At first, my pick was Scott Walker because I appreciated how effective he has been as governor of Wisconsin. When he chose to withdraw from the race, it came down, for me, to a choice between Cruz and Rubio. Although I liked Rubio, Cruz came across as much more consistent and, frankly, as more effective in debate.

That’s when I listened more closely to Cruz’s words and policy positions, and concentrated on his character. As I learned more about him, I became convinced his Christian testimony was genuine, a factor reinforced when I also listened to his wife, Heidi. If she is simply putting on a Christian “show,” she is one of the best actresses in the country. Her faith is the real thing as well.

Cruz is well-spoken, fully knowledgeable on the issues, and projects the kind of seriousness and lack of circus atmosphere that I want in a president. Neither has he descended into the gutter with Donald Trump, no matter how outrageous the latter has become in his personal attacks.

Ted Cruz 4I know that candidates can promise a lot and not be able to deliver, but when Cruz says he wants to repeal every word of Obamacare, he has a track record of attempting to do that very thing. When he declares that he will reverse every single unconstitutional executive order Obama has put into effect, I believe he will do precisely that. Why? He is devoted to constitutional authority and the limits placed on the federal government in that document. He understands that our liberty depends on the rule of law, the federal system, and the separation of powers.

Cruz’s Christian faith makes him a staunch advocate for the pre-born. When he says he will defund Planned Parenthood, he speaks from personal conviction, not political expediency. His Biblical morality is necessary in a time when we are a gender-confused and sex-crazed nation. He knows what real marriage is and what it is not; he knows which bathroom people ought to use.

Doesn’t that last statement reveal the depth of deception rising in our nation right now? Whoever thought anyone would have to affirm that?

Ted CruzTed Cruz will not be a progressive ideologue like the man who currently resides in the White House. He will not be a tinpot dictator who has used the system all his life to get what he wants at everyone else’s expense. Yes, I’m talking about the so-called “frontrunner” for the Republican nomination. A Trump nomination will doom the Republican party to defeat in November.

Hillary Clinton has to be the worst candidate the Democrats have ever put forward. Never has anyone been so eminently beatable. Cruz is the man who can carry Republicans to victory over Clinton. All Republicans have to do now is give him the chance to prove it.

Reject the phony candidate; choose Ted Cruz, the real Christian conservative constitutionalist.

Cruz: “Have We Gone Stark Raving Nuts?”

Donald Trump 4Donald Trump can’t help himself, apparently. That’s because his true self keeps showing up. And what shows up certainly is not Republican.

Yesterday, he Trumpeted two more of his beliefs. First, he said the Republican platform should be altered to soften the statement that the rights of the unborn should always be protected. Second, he weighed in on the North Carolina restroom battle on the side of the transgendered.

Abortion first: Trump believes the Republican platform is too harsh with that statement, that it doesn’t include exceptions. He thinks it ought to specifically state that abortions should be allowed for rape, incest, and the life of the mother.

I know that many Republicans feel the need to add those exceptions. I don’t. The child is still the innocent party here. Take the life of an innocent child when the conception came about through rape or incest? Why? What did the child do that should allow society to murder him or her? As for the life of the mother, what mother would say about a born child, “I want to save my own life; take the life of my child instead”? Jesus told us that there is no greater love than to lay down one’s life for another.

Transgender restroom issue: North Carolina wisely declared that no man claiming to be a woman should be allowed to use a woman’s restroom. Permission to do so opens the door (so to speak) to perverted men who make the claim for the sole reason of wanting to be near their victims. Frankly, this is insane.

What Trump said about this is rather hard to decipher because he doesn’t speak intelligently enough to complete his sentences. His thoughts keep jumping around in a confused manner. If you take the time to try to piece together his disjointed comments, though, it’s clear he comes out on the side of those who want those restrooms to be available to self-proclaimed transgendered persons.

Ted Cruz 3To his credit, Ted Cruz immediately pounced on this, not merely for political advantage—although he ought to receive quite a bit for responding to Trump’s outrageousness—but because he firmly and deeply believes in what he is saying. He began with a comment that all rational people are at least thinking:

“Let me ask you, have we gone stark raving nuts?”

But he didn’t simply stop with that soundbite. He explained further:

Grown adult men, strangers should not be alone in a bathroom with little girls. And that’s not conservative or liberal, that’s not Republican or Democrat, that’s basic common sense. But you know a few months ago, Donald told us he could be the most politically correct person on Earth, and I guess he’s showing us what that looks like. I am waiting with anticipation for the new baseball caps: “Make PC Great Again.”

Let’s be honest here: There is only one person in the race right now who can realistically be called a genuine Republican; only one person who is truly conservative across the board in his beliefs. Cruz is consistent. He deserves our support.

A couple of days ago, Trump misspoke when referring to 9/11. He called that fateful day 7/11. Did I miss the media uproar over that? What if Ted Cruz had made that mistake? What do you think would have happened? It seems our media will let Trump get away with anything.

7-11

As I said in a previous post, I’m getting tired of having to point out the dangers of Trump all the time. I would much rather be clear about why Cruz is the best nominee, not only among those left in this bizarre race, but why, from the start, when there were seventeen candidates, he always was the best choice. I plan to expand on that in a more positive post next week.

Trump’s Difficult Path Unchanged by NY

Donald Trump and his media allies (Fox, because they are blinded by the Trump persona, and the others, because they know he will lose in a landslide to Hillary) are attempting to turn his New York primary win into some kind of final judgment on the Republican nomination.

NY Loves Me

If you, like me, believe in a Ted Cruz nomination, let me offer some down-to-earth reassurance: New York didn’t change the difficult path Trump faces toward getting 1,237 delegates.

First of all, everyone—Cruz included—knew Trump was going to walk away from the New York primary with a big win. That was no surprise. There’s a reason why politics in the state of New York includes a conservative party that can’t stand the Republicans: New York Republicans, by and large, are some of the squishiest in the nation. Cruz’s oft-despised comment about New York values is actually pretty accurate.

NY Values

More New Yorkers voted in the Democrat primary than they did in the Republican, and Cruz tellingly noted that he got more votes in his home state of Texas than Trump did in his home state of New York. In the general election, New York is a lost cause for Republicans no matter whom they nominate.

Next week will be another boasting time for Trump and his media, as he will take the majority of delegates in other East Coast primaries, but after that, his momentum will come to a screeching halt. The Pennsylvania primary, even if Trump wins overall, may not yield the majority of delegates because 54 of that state’s 71 are unbound and can vote for whomever they wish at the convention. Cruz’s team says they have locked up the majority of those.

What we witnessed in Wisconsin and Colorado will come back into play as the Cruz ground game pulls out all the stops. Trump’s ground game is virtually non-existent, and where it does have a semblance of some organization, it has proven woefully and embarrassingly incompetent.

Not In Colorado

May 3 is the Indiana primary. Cruz already has been lining up sympathetic delegates for a second ballot at the convention (as he has been doing in all the upcoming states). The Cruz campaign is bringing in all the people and strategy it used in Wisconsin, and although there are some differences between those two states, there is more in common with Indiana than there are differences. If Indiana governor Mike Pence—who truly can’t stand Trump—comes on board with a Cruz endorsement, everything shifts in Cruz’s direction there.

Then there are many states after that where Cruz is expected to win outright: Nebraska, Montana, South Dakota, Oregon, Washington, and possibly even New Mexico.

One statistician has predicted that even if Trump should get up to 120 delegates of the 172 available in California, he will still fall short of that magic 1,237.

No Republican convention, on a second ballot where delegates are free to choose whomever they wish, is going to nominate Donald Trump.

Of course, that is why he complains so much now, as he looks forward.

Game Rigged

He says the game is rigged, but in reality, he’s not even playing the same game. He depends completely on personality and large rallies, ignoring the “real reality” of how a nomination is won.

Trump and his people have issued threats of all kinds that if the party doesn’t treat him nicely, there will be consequences:

Elephant Gets It

All of that is perfectly in line with the thuggish Trump persona and the type of “best people” he has hired to orchestrate his campaign.

This man as the Republican presidential nominee would be a total disaster. Thankfully, he’s not the lock on the nomination that the media narrative would have you believe.

The Presidential Contest: An Update

Do you know how tiring it is to write about Donald Trump all the time? I mean, how often can one repeat the same things with respect to his character, policies, and complete unfitness for the office of president?

So, in case you were wondering if I can think about anyone else on the political scene, here’s a reminder that I can be an equal-opportunity critic.

Take John Kasich, for instance. He used to be a solid conservative, or at least I thought he was. During this campaign, he has come out as a candidate who seems to have no problem with same-sex marriage or forcing Christian businesses to participate in them. He also thinks North Carolina went too far in ensuring that men don’t go into women’s restrooms. All while using the name of Jesus as the reason for his views.

John Kasich is a no-go for me. Of course, he’s a no-go in this election cycle anyway; he just doesn’t realize it yet.

Best Chance

On the Democrat side—a side that can never earn my vote at any time due to its blatant anti-Christian policies—we have Bernie Sanders challenging Hillary Clinton, winning state after state while she continues to pull away because of so-called “super delegates” who have lined up for her.

Not that I want Sanders to get any traction, mind you. The fact that an outspoken socialist who sounds more like Karl Marx than anyone else can get such an adoring following is a chilling portent for our future as a nation.

Rare Portrait

Hillary, of course, is no better; she’s just a disguised socialist who tries to appear to be something else. It’s actually kind of funny, in one sense, to see Sanders and Clinton criticize each other when they are virtually identical in ideology. At least Sanders is honest about his beliefs and past actions; Hillary has to do her best to hide both:

Misrepresenting

From the start of this campaign, she has felt as if it is “her turn,” and that no one else should even be considered for the nomination:

More Inevitable

We’ve also been told by the highest authority in the land that she will be a great president:

Clinton Jeopardy

Well, that should seal the deal.

And then there’s that small matter of a possible indictment for criminal activities . . . but we’re not supposed to think about that.

Speaking of a sense of entitlement, I must return briefly to Donald Trump, who has become an expert at whining. Everyone is just so unfair to him. Why, all those delegates going over to Cruz in places like North Dakota, Colorado, and Wyoming is theft, total corruption. Never mind that Cruz played by the rules to win those delegates; Trump doesn’t like rules.

Art of Delegate

Yes, Trump will have what the media will call a “good week” or two with primaries in the east, but Cruz’s victories in the west (more are probably coming) and his ability to line up delegates to vote for him on a second ballot at the convention may keep Trump from the nomination after all.

Never in presidential campaign history have I seen two presumed frontrunners in worse shape.

The Front-Runners

Getting back to the prospect of a contested convention on the Republican side, I have no qualms about that. I have a sense of history, and I know what contested conventions can produce:

Contested Convention

In fact, a contested convention this year is the only hope for keeping the Republican party on track because it’s the only path right now that can deny Trump the nomination. And denying him the nomination is paramount for the health of the party and the nation.

What Follows Obama?

One hardly knows how to express anymore the depth of the disaster of the past seven years of Obama. I’ve tried, but am almost at the end of words to describe how he has damaged our country, perhaps irreparably.

The main responsibility of our government—with a president leading the way—is to understand the threats we face and protect our liberties. Yet President Obama has gone out of his way to discard basic liberties, especially for Christians whose consciences are being threatened by that very government. We’re now supposed to bow to the new morality of LGBT correctness in all areas of life, even to the point of accepting transgenderism as natural.

Victim & Bigot

On the economic front, we now have someone who promotes the very ideology that has laid waste to many other nations:

No Difference

And his visit to Cuba only solidified his fascination with that ideology:

Feel So Young

When Islamic radicals terrorize Europe, he practically invites them to come here also:

More Refugees

His anti-colonialism dominates his worldview, blinding him to the real threat:

Message for Pres

When asked what he’s going to do about this threat, he mouths some of the right words for public consumption and says he’s already dealing with it—trust him, his plan will work:

My Plan

What could be worse for the country than what we have experienced in two terms of Obama? Well, a couple of things:

Trump Game

We Prefer

This is why I want Ted Cruz to prevail.

Colorado & Representation: A Primer

Ted CruzHow about a reasonable discussion of what occurred in Colorado over the weekend, devoid of hyperbole and false accusations? First, here are the facts.

Last year, the Colorado Republican party decided to forego a caucus and simply have members of the party meet in their districts and at a general convention and choose delegates to the national convention. Each of Colorado’s congressional districts held their own caucuses to select some of those delegates; the convention then chose the rest.

I’ve always been in favor of the political parties choosing their own people. Open primaries, which allow independents, and even those who are historically members of the opposite party, to vote in the other party’s primary, is nonsensical to me.

So what the Colorado Republican party decided to do with its delegate selection is not unfair, but a true representation of what party activists would like to see happen.

The rules for this selection process were put in place last summer. Every candidate knew about these rules ahead of time. Ted Cruz, wisely, set up a very solid organization that worked hard to get the kinds of delegates who agreed with his candidacy. Donald Trump ignored the rules, did not set up any ground game at all, and didn’t even show up at the convention to speak to the assembled Republicans (8,000 in all).

Result: Cruz won all 34 delegates who are going to the national convention.

And now Trump is calling “foul,” labeling the process as corrupt, saying the people didn’t get a chance to vote. As one of my former students commented on Facebook, she was at that convention and she voted—is Trump saying she wasn’t one of the people?

ConstitutionLet’s dig a little deeper here. We don’t live in a democracy. Rather, we are a constitutional federal republic. The Founders who established the Constitution set up a system whereby the people had a direct vote for the House of Representatives, the state legislatures were represented in the Senate, and official electors from each state, chosen by the state legislatures, would cast the official ballots for president.

In this way, all players in the political “game,” if that’s what you would deem to call it, were represented. A constitutional federal republic believes in representation, but that is not the same as the people in general making all the decisions collectively. We were not supposed to be a “mobocracy.”

In our collective foolishness, an amendment was add to the Constitution back in 1913 that robbed state legislatures of their representation in the federal government by switching the election of senators to the people directly. No longer do senators have to answer to state legislatures and the laws they pass.

I would argue that one very detrimental consequence was Roe v. Wade, which overturned 44 state laws restricting abortions. If senators had had to take into consideration their state laws, they might not have confirmed some of those Supreme Court justices who opened the door to the murder of 58 million innocent babies.

As for the presidency, if you read the Constitution (which I strongly recommend), you will discover that there is no provision at all for a popular vote on who should be president. We allow that popular vote now—a practice that didn’t begin in earnest until about 1828—as a concession to getting some concept of where the people stand. However, it’s not the popular vote that absolutely determines the winner. Just ask President Al Gore about that.

In the same way, the political parties can set up whatever rules they deem proper in determining who should be their candidates. To complain about the process after the fact and begin calling it corrupt (when it didn’t appear to bother anyone ahead of time) is phony.

Donald Trump 3Let’s be clear. Donald Trump has famously announced that he doesn’t play by the rules. He clearly didn’t in this case. He proclaims that he has the best people. Are those the same ones who handed out ballots in Colorado with inaccurate information?

Trump says he can handle the presidency better than anyone in history, yet he cannot put together an organization in each state to deliver his message and get the results he wants.

D0047142_Frame58.tifI agree with Charles Krauthammer, who commented,

I think the assumption that Trump is making, his supporters are making is, that the only really fair way to do this would be something like a national primary, to have a direct correlation between the number of votes you get, and number of delegates, but you know, in Florida, Trump wins 47% of the vote, he gets 100% of the delegates. I didn’t hear anybody complaining about the unfairness. …

And the fact is, everybody’s had the rules for about a year and everybody had a chance to go after the delegates. Trump says in negotiations with the nefarious Chinese, and Mexicans, and Japanese, he’s going to win, they’ve been killing us, they’re so smart. But how’s he going to win? He’s going to have the best people. Well, if you can’t handle the Colorado delegate selection process, how’s he going to handle the nefarious Chinese?

What happened to the 53% of the votes in Florida of those of those who do not support Trump. I don’t think they have any complaint that Trump has all of the delegates, because those were the rules going in, everybody understood them.

As a citizen of Florida, I don’t like the result, but I’m not complaining about how my vote didn’t count. And here’s another point: Trump has amassed about 46% of the delegates at this time while only winning 37% of the vote of the citizens of those very states where he received those delegates.

It appears to me that Donald Trump has been the one who has benefited thus far from the process. Only when he loses a state does he begin to bellow about unfairness.

Just before posting this blog today, I was alerted to a report about the chairman of the Colorado Republican party receiving death threats from Trump supporters. Here’s what Steve House, the party chairman, posted:

Death threats over running a caucus instead of a primary because it is the law here and over the fact that one candidate[Cruz] had a better strategy and a much bigger team on the field.

3000 phone calls with many being the trashiest stuff you can imagine over a tweet we didn’t send and because a candidate [Trump] says he didn’t get to speak at our convention when we tried very hard to get him there.

Shame on the people who think somehow that it is right to threaten me and my family over not liking the outcome of an election.

We need a grownup in the White House, not a petulant child who whines about not getting his way all the time.