The Credibility Problem: Russia & Susan Rice

I try to stay away from definitive statements on current issues until most or all of the facts are known. That’s why I’ve written so little on the whole controversy about Russia’s influence over the presidential election.

Of this I am certain: Trump is not now president because Russia somehow sabotaged voting machines. Trump is president primarily because he ran against Hillary Clinton, arguably the worst major-party presidential candidate in the last . . . oh . . . well, perhaps since the birth of the Republic.

Hillary still hasn’t come to grips with that. She’s still out there making comments about how discrimination against women is why she lost. Fortunately, what she thinks doesn’t matter much now; she’s free to live in whatever fantasy world she chooses.

But did Russia try to influence public opinion toward Trump in devious ways? Keep in mind that Russia always has tried to do whatever it could to undermine America. Back in the Reagan years, there is evidence the old USSR was using Sen. Ted Kennedy to get Reagan out in the 1984 election, and the senator was a willing accomplice. He was never a model of pristine character.

By the way, Russian interference in 1984 didn’t exactly count for much in the final tally:

As the current probe slogged along, Republican Devin Nunes, chair of the House Intelligence Committee, made a misstep by making a public announcement about how our intelligence services incidentally caught information on Trump transition members apparently being mentioned by Russian operatives, but that such incidental information did not reveal any collusion. Nunes’s false step was to say something about this publicly rather than going directly to his committee.

That bad decision led to a political furor by the Democrats (who are well-practiced in political furor), and now Nunes is under investigation for an ethics violation. He has had to recuse himself from the Russia probe.

The names of those Trump people somehow were made public. That is against the law. All kinds of suspicion, entirely warranted, has been directed at the Obama administration in its final days doing whatever it could to weaken the incoming administration.

The name that has come to the surface is Susan Rice, Obama’s former UN ambassador and national security advisor. Isn’t it amazing how she always seems to show up whenever there is a need to find someone to explain away Obama’s misdeeds?

Rice doesn’t have a history that engenders confidence in her integrity. Anyone recall that she became the face of the Obama team when they totally mishandled Benghazi? Anyone recall how she went on all the Sunday talk shows and peddled the Big Lie about a video causing the attack on American personnel in Libya? Anyone recall how she did it with no embarrassment at all?

Well, she’s back. She started off by saying she knew nothing about the intelligence gathering that caught some Trump people. Then that shifted into an admission that she did request to know the names of those people—within the legal allowance—but that she certainly wasn’t responsible for leaking those names to the public.

That’s her story and she’s sticking to it.

Susan Rice has no credibility.

What really happened with Russia and what should we be concerned about? The investigation is ongoing. The real question is whether it will be a real investigation or merely another in a long line of political one-upsmanship.

The House Intelligence Committee needs to demonstrate that it has more credibility than Susan Rice.

Russia, Sessions, & the Media: Oh, My!

Russian influence has been all the rage lately. Democrats want to prove that somehow Russia caused Hillary to lose the election. Good luck with that. She was her own worst enemy. Denial is a terrible thing, leading to blindness.

I won’t deny something, though, and that’s the uncomfortable sense that Trump is far too comfortable with Vladimir Putin. For that reason alone, I don’t mind investigations going forward to find out who may have been too connected to Russian influences. But I want that investigation to go both directions: Republican and Democrat.

Amnesia works wonders. How many recall that accidental hot mike incident when Obama told the Russian leader at the time that once he got reelected, he could be more flexible? Investigations, anyone?

Now AG Jeff Sessions has become the latest target. He is accused of meeting with Russian officials during the campaign. What is forgotten is that he was a senator with foreign relations responsibilities. One of those “meetings” has now been revealed as having been set up by the Obama administration, and it was with a number of foreign officials, not just Russian.

Do I know all the truth about those accusations? No. But do I suspect they are bogus? Yes.

I support the call for a thorough investigation; let the chips fall where they may. But the news media’s thirst for a Republican scandal says more about them than Sessions. Most of the media is, and has been, simply another arm of the Democrat party, in concert with its goals:

I seem to recall another AG who did some things that didn’t seem to bother the media:

Trump may be generally unpopular, but the media may be even more reprehensible in the public’s eyes, and for good reason:

I will never be at ease with Trump’s tweeting, nor with his basic character. As I have said before and will repeat now, I will support him when he is right and call him out when he is wrong. I will do my best to be an honest commentator.

His war with the media has many conservatives thrilled; I think some would like to see him go even further:

Frankly, though, I’m not convinced the “war” is all that genuine. He’s a showman; he knows how to whip up an audience. As long as he can do so with this approach, he will use it. If it becomes counterproductive, he will switch gears.

Character remains the bedrock foundation upon which good government is built. Let’s never forget that.

A Sober Assessment Going Forward

On this Inauguration Day, I want to address the following: the political spectacle Democrats are unleashing; a sober assessment of our new president; and the attitude I hope conservatives in general, and Christians in particular, should have as we embark on the next four years.

First, the Democrats. A new political cartoon this morning seems to encapsulate the mindset of the entire liberal/progressive political spectrum ever since the election:

As a number of commentators have noted, Democrats protesting the inauguration of a Republican president is nothing new. Many have done so at each inauguration dating from Richard Nixon’s in 1969. It has become a rite of passage for some into the ranks of the perpetually peeved. Rep. John Lewis has been in the news by calling Trump an illegitimate president and saying he will now absent himself from the inauguration for the first time in his life. He seems to have forgotten that he did it before, when George Bush was inaugurated. He considered him illegitimate, too.

Maybe it’s become more of a reflex than a thoughtful decision: “It’s a Republican; I have to stay away.”

The number of Democrat congressmen and congresswomen declining to attend may be greater this time simply because Trump is so controversial, but having them stay away from the Capitol may not be the worst idea they have had. If only they would do it more often the nation might be in better shape.

The Democrat reaction to Trump has given a whole new meaning to the festivities surrounding this day:

As for Donald Trump himself, let me offer, as I said at the outset, a sober assessment.

Most of you reading this know that throughout the primaries I was an adamant opponent of Trump’s nomination. In the general election, I couldn’t bring myself to vote for him and turned to a third party for the first time in my life. The best results from that election, for me, were that we were spared another Clinton presidency and that Republicans not only maintained control of Congress but also increased their strength in state legislatures and governorships.

Despite my opposition to Trump, I am not like those Democrats. I recognize the legitimacy of his election because I understand how the electoral college system works. It was only the overwhelming California vote for Hillary that allowed her to win the popular vote. The rest of the country voted against her.

Therefore, as a loyal American citizen, I will do my best to support our new president. My attitude for the next four years will be to praise Trump when he does things that are constitutional and positive for the nation and to point out when he goes astray.

What have I seen since his election that gives me some hope? I can offer the following:

  • Most of his choices for people to man the administration have been very good—not all, but most. I give him credit for picking some who have principles that will help pull the nation back from the abyss if he allows them to follow their principles.
  • He has made it clear he will attempt to strengthen the military, ramp up the battle against radical Islamic terrorism, and stand with Israel when the rest of the world seems inclined to isolate and abandon that one country in the Middle East that is our ally.
  • He continues to promise to overturn Obama’s unconstitutional executive orders, to rid the nation of the Obamacare catastrophe, and to nominate a Supreme Court justice who will help return the Court’s decisions back to constitutionalism.

All well and good, if he follows through on those promises.

On the negative side are his affinity for Putin and Russia, his apparent disdain for NATO, his confusing comments on healthcare (everyone will be covered by the government, he says—how does that overturn Obamacare?), his bullying tactics at times, and—this is the one that continues to bother me most—his personal character.

Simply put, I don’t trust Donald Trump. His personal history reveals a man who is a constant braggart, totally self-absorbed, and unable in the core of his being to stop insulting his detractors. I’m afraid we have gone from the Selfie President to the Tweeter-in-Chief, and that’s not necessarily an improvement.

People keep saying Trump will “grow” into the office and not act so juvenile once the full responsibilities of the presidency hit him. Based on what I’ve seen thus far, I’m not convinced. Donald Trump is Donald Trump; he’s unlikely to change. What could this mean for us if something really gets under his skin?

Can he handle criticism properly or will everything become personal? It’s a valid question. And while many of his most ardent admirers love the way he uses Twitter to get his “message” out, I find it rather demeaning to what may be left of the dignity of the presidency. Let’s at least not change the seal that goes with the office:

Last of all, an appeal to conservatives overall and Christians in particular. Keep in mind that Trump has no real ideological foundation for grasping Christian conservative principles. That, along with his character, was why I could not support his nomination.

Quite a few readers castigated those, like me, who considered themselves NeverTrump. Please know that we took that stance as a matter of principle. Even if you disagreed with the position, I hope you will grant us that, at least.

What I’m concerned about now is another group that perhaps can be labeled AlwaysTrump. These are people who will defend Trump no matter what, who will find a rationalization for everything he does, regardless of how unconstitutional or offensive his decisions/actions may be.

Here’s my appeal: don’t allow yourselves to be AlwaysTrump; never surrender your reasoning powers and your conscience; stand instead for principle; keep your integrity.

I will do my best to be an honest commentator as the Trump administration goes forward. I will not dump on Trump as a reflex action (I’m not a Democrat). I will give him credit where it is due. If he follows through on his promises, I will say so. I truly hope he surprises me in new ways over the next four years, and my fervent prayer is that God will use him (whether or not he acknowledges that’s what’s happening) and those he has chosen to serve with him to help restore our spiritual and moral foundation.

When I do critique his actions, though, I also hope that my readers will realize I am doing so not out of personal pique but as a sober assessment of what he has done.

If you are seeking a commentator who will criticize everything Trump does, no matter what it is, I’m not that person.

If you are seeking a commentator who will praise everything Trump does, no matter what it is, I’m not that person.

But if you want honest commentary, commentary with integrity based on a devotion to the Biblical worldview and to constitutional government, then I invite you to come back often to this blog. My pledge is that I will be that kind of commentator.

Transitions All Around

The media naturally is glued to Trump Tower during this transition period, as the president-elect figures out who to nominate for various positions in his administration. Less attention has been given to the Democrat transition going on simultaneously. For instance, the Democrats in the House have chosen their “new” leader:

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Not to mention the team being assembled by the Democrats:

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College campuses have been hit particularly hard by the election. The transition there has become especially difficult:

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Campuses are supposed to be where students get educated, where they grapple with facts and interpretation of the facts. They’re not supposed to be playgrounds or childcare facilities for those who can’t grow up:

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Hillary Clinton also is having a hard time processing what happened. She’s now blaming “fake news” for her defeat. Let’s be clear: fake news exists, and it exists on both sides. It takes a certain amount of maturity and discernment to ferret out the fake from the true sometimes. But Hillary is not the person who should be complaining about spreading fake stories:

fake-news-epidemic

Donald Trump needs to be careful here, too. He’s tweeting (of course) about how he won a historic victory of landslide proportions. No, he barely won some key states, thereby allowing him to squeak by in the electoral college despite losing the popular vote nationwide. As a historian, I know what amounts to a landslide—FDR in 1932, Reagan in 1984 being prime examples.

Time magazine has just named Trump as its Person of the Year. That’s to be expected, given his surprise win. Yet he needs to learn humility. The cover for Time needs to be more accurate:

not-hillary

That’s probably the main reason he won.

Accepting the Trump Victory

I believe in the rule of law. Regular readers of my blog know of my concerns about Donald Trump. Yet he has won the election and is the legitimate president-elect. I warned about him during the primaries; I even hoped for some kind of reversal of his coronation at the Republican convention. But now that the election is past, all American citizens need to accept the reality of a Trump presidency and pray for the best.

At least he’s not Hillary Clinton. You know, that candidate that still won’t quite go away.

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The phony recounts should be curtailed. Threats against official electors should be investigated. President Donald Trump is the looming reality, and it’s time for all the juvenile protests to end.

first-snowflake

Yet we have so-called sanctuary cities digging in their heels and saying that federal law doesn’t apply there. That’s the same spirit that agitated South Carolina back in the 1830s when that state attempted to nullify a federal law, one that was passed with constitutional authority.

The same applies to immigration and naturalization laws: they are constitutional and need to be complied with or those cities should lose all federal money that goes to them (most of it unconstitutional, by the way).

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It’s actually rather funny/sad to see Mayor Rahm Emanuel of Chicago declare his city as a sanctuary for anyone:

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Trump has made a lot of promises.

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Some of them I would like to see fulfilled; others, not so much. But it’s going to take more than a tweet flurry to accomplish what he wants to do. It’s going to take wise counsel and emotional maturity. I have yet to comment on the people he has chosen to surround himself with in his administration, but that will be forthcoming. I still want to find out who will fill that very key role of secretary of state before offering an opinion.

Yes, I do want Trump to succeed, provided those successes are of the constitutional variety. I remain in wait-and-see mode.

Election Fallout Continues

Bill Clinton and Gary Johnson at the Presidential Election ForumThe Green Party candidate, Jill Stein, has figured out a way to get more “green.” Raising funds for election recounts in Wisconsin, Michigan, and Pennsylvania has given her more publicity than anything she did during the campaign. Since there’s no possible way a recount gives her the presidency, and because she doesn’t really care that much about Hillary Clinton, her reasons for pushing this, many people believe, are purely monetary.

She will say, of course, that the goal is election integrity, but the chance of reversing the vote total in any of those states is infinitesimally small. I’ll go with the money and publicity angle.

The Clintons’ fortunes have definitely taken a downturn with the election result. I wonder what all those donors to the Clinton Foundation are thinking now?

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The lucrative speaking business for the Clintons may take a hit. Does anyone think Hillary is going to pull in six-figure fees now?

clinton-mart

Even though Trump has said he won’t pursue prosecution of Hillary (thereby breaking a promise to his followers and fidelity to the rule of law), the FBI’s investigation into the Clinton Foundation continues. Will justice ever be done?

The Democrat party overall is in disarray. That doesn’t bother me. Only one person seems to have landed on his feet, though undeservedly:

survivor

Obama’s policies (and arrogance) combined with Hillary’s corruption (and arrogance) have led to this electoral disaster. They have no one to blame but themselves.

Meanwhile, Trump is in the process of choosing his cabinet and other key advisors. A number of his nominees are very good; a few are questionable. I’m still of the opinion that putting Mike Pence in charge of running the country is the best option:

big-decisions

Whenever Trump does something right, I will back him. Whenever he goes off the rails, I will point that out. My goal is to be scrupulously fair to him. I won’t be a critic just for the sake of criticism, but neither will I promote him when he violates the oath of office.

Once all of his key nominations have been made public, I’ll provide an assessment of those individuals.

It’s not just a cliché to say that I am praying for the best for our country.

Obama’s Crumbling Legacy

Even though I didn’t want Donald Trump to be president, I didn’t want Hillary Clinton either. So I’m going to have to live with the results of the election. One of the most satisfying aspects of those results is the absolute rejection of nearly everything Barack Obama has tried to do.

Amazing, isn’t it, how he now talks about the need to work together. Must have something to do with the potential loss of his “landmark” legislation inaccurately called the Affordable Care Act.

ready-to-work

“Compromise” has now become a word he’s willing to use. Don’t get too excited, though; his application of the word might not be the same as yours:

compromise

After eight years of working so hard to fundamentally transform America, he’s a little alarmed about all that work being for naught:

obama-legacy

I recall something in the Scriptures about building on sandy foundations. You can look it up.

Democrats, meanwhile, have discovered that they are rudderless, having tied themselves to a cult of personality for so long. What are they to do?

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Frankly, if they remain rudderless, I won’t mind.

One of their biggest cries of anguish stems from the fact that Hillary lost the electoral vote while winning the popular vote. They tried that ploy back in 2000; it won’t get them any further this time around.

Why did Hillary win the popular vote? Is it because she was more popular nationwide, or is it due to an overwhelming popularity in California and New York? There’s a reason why the electoral college is still the better way to choose a president—it doesn’t allow for a few large states to determine the winner. Smaller states still have a proportional say in who the nation really wants.

A Democrat dream would look like this:

without-electoral-collegeExcept for Texas, this method of choosing the president would almost always guarantee a Democrat victory. As usual, the Founders knew better.