Everyone Else Is to Blame

Some people just won’t go away. Former president Obama is one. He’s already making public comments on his successor, pointedly criticizing his policies. It might be helpful if Obama could remember how George W. Bush treated him when he took office. Honoring a long tradition of allowing the new president to set his own course, Bush never launched into a public critique. But that was when honor was still something people cared about.

Now we have Hillary Clinton refusing to exit stage left quietly. I know this is kind of old news, but I haven’t been commenting on politics recently—I have to catch up.

What’s remarkable about Hillary’s public statements of late is that they are so tone-deaf and ridiculous that even her own Democrat party leaders are distancing themselves from her.

She simply can’t come to terms with her loss in the last election, and she doesn’t seem the least bit willing to admit she might be the biggest factor in that loss. No, everyone else is to blame.

Surely the loss couldn’t have had anything to do with a private e-mail server, Benghazi, or the antics of the Clinton Foundation. Of course not. She deserved to be president because her last name is Clinton (when she chooses to use it instead of Rodham). The new president is illegitimate.

In her commencement speech to her alma mater, Wellesley, she did joke (as much as Hillary can ever joke about anything) that a little liquid imbibing helped get her through the defeat, but again, there was nothing in that speech that displayed any knowledge of her own faults. Those listening, though, might have picked up on one of those faults:

How does one develop a seared conscience? It can start at a young age and become such a habit pattern that one actually begins believing the falsehoods:

The nation dodged one bullet in November. We’re still trying to deal with the other bullet. More on that tomorrow.

Hillary & the Seared Conscience

The Scriptures tell us how people can develop a seared conscience. It comes from committing a sin so often that, after a while, it no longer bothers the person committing the sin. The sin itself becomes part of that person’s character.

We see two outstanding examples of this phenomenon in both of our principal presidential candidates, but Hillary Clinton’s propensity for unremitting lying has been getting most of the attention lately . . . and shall I say finally?

Nearly every statement she has ever made about her e-mail server has now been publicly exposed as a lie. The latest revelations in the FBI notes when that agency interviewed her are that her people used what they hoped would be a super-strong program to wipe the server clean and that many of the phones she used were destroyed, sometimes simply by using a hammer.

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Intimately connected with the server/e-mail lies are the lies associated with the now-infamous Clinton Foundation, the recipient of funds from people (some being foreign powers) who sought favors from the Hillary-led State Department, which is probably the reason for all the e-mail server secrecy in the first place:

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But what has caught the public’s attention more recently was Hillary’s collapse as she exited the 9/11 ceremony early on Sunday. If you have seen the video, it is startling just how incapacitated she appeared, having to be supported wholly by others as she was practically thrown into the waiting van.

Eventually, the campaign said she was suffering from pneumonia. With all the stories circulating about far worse health issues, many are finding that explanation something less than believable. If she will lie about everything else, why not her health?

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Whatever her real condition, one can gauge how serious it must be if one follows the Clintons’ history:

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Perhaps the most amazing thing about the episode is the relative silence coming from Donald Trump. What happened to his Twitter account? Where are the usual insults and inane comments that his campaign has to clarify afterwards?

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Those of you who thought you were getting someone who was not a “manufactured” candidate might have to rethink that assumption. The professionals are doing all they can to make him seem credible and normal. Give them a break; it’s a tough job.