Obama's Friends and Mentors

It has been virtually impossible to get the mainstream media to properly investigate all of Obama’s allies. Hardly anyone mentions Obama’s connection to the writings of Saul Alinsky, the “original” community organizer whose philosophy was decidedly Marxist. What does Obama say about Alinsky?

Finally, a few days ago, the New York Times wrote an article about William Ayers, one of the founders of the radical group Weatherman. Ayers set bombs at the Pentagon and the Capitol back in the early 1970s. Everyone knows he did it; he got off only on a technicality regarding prosecutorial malpractice. He does not regret what he did; he wishes he could have done more. The only problem with the Times piece is that it is an apologetic for Obama, concluding he didn’t really know Ayers all that well–an assertion that is easily refuted.

Obama’s political career started in William Ayers’s living room. He served on boards with Ayers. He channeled money to Ayers that was used to indoctrinate children into radical politics. What does Obama say about Ayers?

Tony Rezko is a real estate wheeler-dealer who contributed to Obama’s campaign and helped him get a house through rather shady practices. He was recently convicted of fraud and bribery. Obama, of course, comments:

And how can one forget the Rev. Jeremiah Wright, Obama’s pastor for over 20 years? He and his church are the epitome of radical thought based on liberation theology. Obama supposedly listened to him all those years and yet his attitude toward him right now?

Finally (at least for the purposes of this post), there is Franklin Raines, former Clinton administration official who then went on to “manage” Fannie Mae. When he left, he took with him over $90 million in bonuses. He has been one of Obama’s financial advisors (just because he is not on the payroll doesn’t mean he isn’t actively involved in the campaign). Obama on Raines?

In light of all this, what should America say to Obama?

Burdens, Anger, Sorrow, and Prayer

As I sit down and write in this blog today, I’m not really sure where my thoughts are going to end up. All I know is that I am terribly burdened for the future of this nation. Christians sometimes talk about feeling a burden for a specific person or problem; well, that’s where I am today.

Where is the line between anger and sorrow? I reach a point where I don’t want to hear the same old lies over and over as I listen to the political debate. An anger stirs within me that wants to be released in a shout or a prophetic utterance of some kind. How I wish at times I could be Jeremiah, and point to certain individuals and say, “You want to know what evil is? Here, look at this person. This is evil.”

Yet I cannot allow the anger to take over. There is such a thing as righteous anger, and when you feel it, you have not sinned. What it should lead to, though, is a deep sorrow–sorrow over the deceptive practices, sorrow over the blindness of the people who are led astray, sorrow over what this portends for the country as a whole.

Too many Christians, I’m afraid, retreat into a well-worn phrase: “God is still in control.” While I agree that ultimately all people will answer to Him, I am also quite aware that not everything that happens is His will. He has given us the ability to choose, and more often than not, people choose sin. We cannot simply rest on the idea that God is in control. What we do in this life has consequences. Can God overrule some decisions? Of course. Can He bring good out of evil? He has done so many times. But that doesn’t mean the evil is not real; it doesn’t mean that there won’t be disastrous results emanating from our sinful choices.

So that’s where I am today. This burden I feel should lead to prayer. That is where we find the presence of God; that is where He gives us direction; that is where He offers His peace; and only through prayer will anything change.

The presidential and congressional elections are now less than one month away. If you feel this same burden, I urge you to pray for God’s will to be done.

Obama, Abortion, & Infanticide

My last post talked about the image of God in man and how that relates to the sanctity of life. If you really want to see into the heart and soul of a person, the abortion issue opens that window wide. Take Barack Obama, for instance.

When he was an Illinois state senator, Obama, on more than one occasion, stopped a bill from passing that would have ensured that babies born alive in an abortion attempt would receive medical care. At one point, he was the only senator to speak out against the bill. His reasoning is quite clear: he was afraid that the passage of that bill would somehow overturn the “right” to an abortion.

Now, he has since indignantly denied that he would ever vote to withhold medical care from such infants. I won’t go through all the twists and turns of the denials he has offered, but if you want to check that out, you can go directly to this article from the National Right to Life Committee. It makes the case: http://www.nrlc.org/obamaBAIPA/Obamacoveruponbornalive.htm

In short, for Obama, the so-called right to abortion has a higher priority than protecting the life of an innocent child who “accidentally” was born alive during an abortion procedure. The following cartoon, I think, depicts the attitude accurately.

Naturally, Obama doesn’t want the truth about this to come out, but as John Adams once stated in making his case before a jury:

Facts are stubborn things; and whatever may be our wishes, our inclinations, or the dictates of our passion, they cannot alter the state of facts and evidence.

Principle: Made in God's Image

In early America, there was little debate about who man was. Nearly everyone agreed man was a being made in the image of God. What did that mean?

First, it meant that God had transferred many of His attributes to his creation: man was given intellect, emotions, and the power to choose good and evil. He also had a spirit. Just as God is a spirit, so man was more than a material being. He also would live forever, the destination predicated on his choice.

Second, it meant that man was God’s highest creation and that the life He breathed into him was the greatest gift that could possibly be given. It was a gift that was to be honored and protected. It meant that life was sacred. We know that’s how God viewed it when He declared that anyone who would take away the life of another would suffer the same penalty, thereby sanctioning capital punishment.

There is a difference between taking the life of a murderer (a task given to civil society) and taking the life of an innocent person. The ultimate innocent person is one who has never chosen right from wrong because he or she is still inside the womb.

The Ultimate Innocent Person

The Ultimate Innocent Person

When we later adopted the view that man simply evolved from lower life forms, we discarded the idea that man is a special creation of God. We reduced him to a mass of chemicals or a blob of tissue. That’s why it is so much easier now to discard unwanted human life, either in the womb or when a person is no longer considered “useful” to society.

A society that can allow this type of behavior is a society in rebellion against its Creator. It will pay a penalty. Our mission is to trumpet the message that man IS made in God’s own image, as we seek to reverse policies that destroy innocent life.

Check Out This Article

I heartily recommend Mark Steyn to you. He is one of the wittiest political commentators on the face of the earth. His latest on the difference between Sarah Palin and Joe Biden is too good to withhold. Go to the link here and enjoy.

http://article.nationalreview.com/?q=ZmNjYTc3NzFiZGU1NjM2YmQ3NmMzNTM3NjJlNGMzMjU=

Prophet or Priest?

As a Christian, what am I supposed to be when commenting on politics? Am I to be the prophetic voice, warning against the dangers of voting wrongly and following wrong policies? Am I to be the compassionate voice that draws people to God by staying away from controversy?

Is it possible to be so prophetic in one’s approach that people are turned away from the truth? Likewise, is it possible to be so open and compassionate toward those with differing views that you never lead them to the truth, for fear of offending?

For those of us who believe that the Lord is the be-all and end-all of life, that nothing is more important than a relationship with Him, it may appear unseemly at times to get embroiled in the criticisms of the political scene. After all, isn’t this life just a temporary waystation on the way to eternity?

Yet God has put us in this world to make a difference while we are here. What we do–and how we do it–will influence the future of this nation as well as the eternal destiny of individuals. And there can be a link between the two. In a nation that honors God and follows His principles, there is liberty to teach His ways openly to all. If that nation instead passes laws that shut down those who teach the Gospel truths, more people will remain lost in spiritual darkness.

That can happen, by the way. In Canada, it has become a hate crime to speak against homosexuality. There are those who seek power today who would like to bring that type of law to the United States. So what we do does matter.

How do we combine the prophetic role with the priestly one? I look at the example of Jesus, who welcomed all who came to Him, whether prostitutes or Pharisees. Yet He was direct and harsh at times with those who set themselves up against the ways of God. He called some Pharisees whitewashed tombs, pretty on the outside, but full of dead men’s bones within. He did turn over the moneychangers’ tables in the Temple.

We can speak forcefully and directly. Being a Christian does not mean you have lost a backbone; in fact, it means you have finally found one. Yet we are always admonished to speak the truth in love. Notice both parts of that: we are to be loving in everything we say, but we speak the truth simultaneously. And that truth can be pointed and contain dire warnings. We must continually check our hearts to be sure we have the proper attitude. This portion of Psalm 51 jumps out at me today:

Create in me a clean heart, O God, and renew a steadfast spirit within me. Do not cast me away from Your presence and do not take Your Holy Spirit from me.

Restore to me the joy of Your salvation and sustain me with a willing spirit. Then I will teach transgressors Your ways, and sinners will be converted to You.

At the Root of Our Financial Problems

I don’t normally post more than once per day, but I think this is so enlightening that I wanted to be sure to offer it now. Perhaps you’ve already seen it, since it has been making the rounds, but here’s another opportunity in case you haven’t. If you can spare 8 1/2 minutes, you will find out why we are in this current financial mess. Click on this link and learn.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MGT_cSi7Rs&NR=1